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Backwater Basics to Catching Juvenile Tarpon On The Fly with TFO Ambassador Logan Totten

 

With Spring in full affect down in Southwest Florida, the temperatures are warming up, and the rain is right around the corner. This means a few things, the most important to most fly fisherman, is that juvenile and baby tarpon season is upon us. Being eager to eat flies, pull hard, fight mean and always so acrobatic – these little guys are dream fish for many anglers.

Tarpon are often seen rolling when they come up for air, which can make them fun to fish for, and it’s also a great way to locate them. Early morning in the spring in summer is of the best times to locate these rolling fish. Finding these little guys can be difficult, so here are a few tips I have picked up to be more affective while targeting small tarpon on the fly rod.

 

Location & Depth Changes

Finding the right fish for fly fishing can mean the difference in actually catching fish or just casting all morning at rolling fish. Tarpon generally like staying in deeper holes or canals where they can have safety in the depth. However, when they are eating, they will push into shallow water, edges and mangrove shorelines chasing small baitfish and minnows. This is where you will have a much higher success rate in getting one to eat your fly. Which brings us to the next tip..

Streamer Patterns, Colors, & Size

Smaller size streamer “baitfish & minnow” patterns is a must in my book. Flies like the EP micro minnow, Schminnow and Laserminnow are a few that have been proven to produce in many conditions. The smaller the better sometimes – especially when they’re keyed in on the tiny fry bait.

For colors to use, I go by the old rule of thumb — dark water, dark colors like blacks and purples; light water, light colors like whites chartreuse and natural colors. This can also be applied to the weather conditions. During the mornings/evenings and also low light days when its cloudy darker colors, you can throw a better silhouette and brighter sunny days bright colors can be less intrusive.

Gear Setup

Having the right gear is important so you can have an easy carefree day on the water. I generally like to use smaller rods that will still allow you to cast in the wind or punch larger patterns like small gurglers. The Axiom ll or Axiom II-X in 5-6 weight has been great for this job and was built for these salt conditions. Fishing in tight conditions like mangrove tunnels crazy stuff happens so its nice having a rod that is backed by its company with an unbeatable warranty.

For the reel, I use an older BVK reel, but the BVK SD reel would be a great affordable choice. Sometimes to get way back where the little guys live kayaking or wading can be your best access which often leads to reels getting submerged or wet. This makes the BVK SD ideal with its light weight frame and sealed drag.

I typically use a weight forward floating fly line, and my preferred leader setups are 16-20 lb tapered leader for the babies. For the bigger juveniles, I typically run a 16-20 lb tapered leader with a 12” 25-30 lb section.

 

Retrieval & Strip Patterns

Last but not least, for a productive day of baby tarpon fishing, getting your strip cadence down is imperative. Juvenile tarpon are aggressive fast fish and 90% of the time I like a short consistent fast strip. Even if you feel a bite, just keep stripping. They will often miss or short strike the fly so it’s crucial not to rip the bait away from the fish. There has been many times where I have had a single fish take multiple swings at a fly in the same retrieve and finally hooked him on his 4th or 5th try.

Juvenile Tarpon are an awesome fish to target on light fly rods for anybody from beginner to expert and applying a few simple principles can make your time on the water much more productive. One of my main tips for anybody is to keep it simple and have fun!

 

Words and photos provided by Logan Totten. Logan is a TFO Ambassador based out of Englewood, Florida. He also works at TFO dealer/fly shop West Wall Outfitters in Port Charlotte, and runs a guiding service on the side called Backcountry Paddle Adventures. For further questions, you can reach out to Logan at backcountrypaddleadventures@yahoo.com.

 

COVID-19 Update

In light of ongoing global health concerns, we want to let you know that your well-being, and the well-being of our team members, is our number one priority.

We are carefully following all appropriate safety procedures as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And we are ensuring our team members are safe so that they can continue to take care of our anglers.

TFO is located in the County of Dallas, Texas, which has ordered all businesses to cease activities at facilities located within the county effective March 23rd at 11:59PM. This means that we will have limited operations until further notice to help do our part to stem the spread of COVID-19 and protect the safety of our team members. Our customer service will remain open and we will continue to do our best to support our dealer and anglers promptly. Our fulfillment department will operate in compliance with the County of Dallas order and we will keep our customers notified of any changes to the situation. Please check our website and social media outlets for further updates. We hope you and your loved ones are safe and healthy.

We look forward to continuing to provide you great fishing tools to better enjoy the outdoors.

Sincerely,

TFO

Customer Service: As mentioned above, we have had to reduce our phone coverage hours to comply with County of Dallas requirements and to maintain the safety of our customer service team. We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause. During this time please email us at info@tforods.com for the fastest response.


Update On Warranty Repairs

Please note that the impact of COVID-19 has caused us to have limited operations at our warehouse in Dallas. While our customer service and warranty repairs will remain active, we are working with limited staff, and there might a longer than normal return time for repairs.

To insure the location of your shipment, please be sure to grab your tracking information from the carrier you use for your records.

 

Generation To Generation

My parents belonged to the greatest generation, although no one ever told them until late in their lives. I’m pretty sure they didn’t realize it when they were my age and definitely not at my kids age. They never realized how great they were; they simply returned from the war, got married, got jobs and raised families. Since then, we’ve had baby boomers, Generations X, Y and Z, millennials and probably several others along the way.

One thing has remained constant across the generations, however, at least in my family; each generation invests in the next, not necessarily in a material sense but by passing down wisdom, values and passions. My love of the outdoors was learned from my dad, which I in turn, have passed down to my children and their spouses. I learned to fish standing by my father’s side. At first he tied the knots and baited the looks, but soon taught me to do it myself. I not only learned to fish, but also to appreciate the beauty of God’s creation. I gained respect for the fish I caught and other animals I hunted. My dad was my role model, hero as well as mentor.

I learned fly fishing as an adult, partially from my father but also from other mentors. With a sport as complex as fly fishing, mentorship serves a vital role to a fledgling angler. Some of my fly fishing mentors are well known like Lefty Kreh and Ed Jaworowski, but many others are less famous but still just as important. Each planted the seeds or nurtured my growth, helping me to develop as an angler and man. I honor my father and all my other mentors when I share with others what was taught to me.

Now my kids are sharing this passion and wisdom with their children. In our family, this begins at an early age. On a recent family trip to the Driftless Streams in Northeast Iowa, we introduced my grandson, Gage and granddaughter Emma to fly fishing. My wife, Jo took photos of Gage on Evan’s back as he fished. Michelle made sure he was warm and snug. Clay carried Emma in a chest pack.

Even though Gage and Emma were far too young to fish or even walk along the stream banks, we enjoyed the outdoors as a family, laughed a lot and even caught some pretty nice fish. But I stood back at one point and simply took it all in, admittedly a little choked up on that beautiful morning. I sensed the warmth of my dad’s smile. He would have been delighted. And Lefty too; as my daughter Erin held the rod and I place my hand over hers, Lefty’s hand was there too, guiding us through the casting stroke.

Written by TFO National Advisor Jason Randall

*All Photos Provided By Jo Randall*

Ross Evans Joins TFO as New National Sales Manager

 

For Immediate Release

January 6, 2020

Temple Fork Outfitters is proud to announce Ross Evans as its new National Sales Manager. With over twenty years of proven sales success in the fishing and outdoor industry, Ross joins TFO by way of Shimano North America Fishing, where he most recently oversaw sales throughout the Upper Midwest. Prior to Shimano, Ross was with Navionics Inc. as one of their top Regional Sales Managers.

Ross is an experienced sales force leader with a track record of achievement. He looks now to expand TFO’s retail footprint alongside its growing online presence. Ross recently had this to say about his new role… “I’m humbled and honored to join the TFO family and I look forward to the coming years helping make TFO a top national brand in both fly and conventional.”

When not on the road, Ross enjoys all seasons in the upper Midwest. Whether fishing in spring and summer, chasing whitetails in the fall or riding snowmobiles and ice fishing in the winter, Ross finds joy in his surroundings at home, as well as in the company of his wife, Mindy, to whom he has been married for twelve wonderful years.

 

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO):

TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork.

For more information, please visit www.tforods.com

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters

instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters

twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.

 

 

Swim Jig Fishing Tactics for Spring and Fall Bass Fishing

During the spring and fall, out west and on lakes across the country when the bass are shallow, TFO Ambassador Steve Lund has found that a combination of various swim jig techniques and specific jig patterns really excel. Here’s how he has found success.

 

TARGETING THE SPAWN PERIODS EFFECTIVELY

During the spring time, bass move shallow for pre-spawn, spawn, and immediate post spawn periods.  In most lakes this means fishing around some type of cover.  A weedless swim jig is a very versatile bait as it can be fished slow, fast, or even skipped, and is very forgiving by not hanging up so easily. This means more time fishing and also allows you to present your bait within the strike zone even in tight covered areas.  

Pre-Spawn > Spawn

During Pre-spawn and spawn I prefer to use a 3/8 ounce Confidence Tackle Supply swim jig in bluegill pattern paired with a Keitech Easy Shiner swimbait as bass are feeding up during pre-spawn and during the spawn they are guarding their nests from bluegill.  

Post-Spawn

Post-spawn I transition mostly to a 3/8 ounce Confidence Tackle Supply swim jig in baitfish, white, or chartreuse/white (depending on water clarity/visibility) as bass tend to push and gorge themselves on baitfish after the spawn, but I will still give the bluegill color swim jig a try as bass will still be guarding their hatched fry at this time and bluegill are usually enemy number one. 

Fall 

In the fall after the water begins to cool this sparks a feeding frenzy where bass will push bait fish shallow, so I will again throw a 3/8 ounce Confidence Tackle Supply baitfish color, white, or sometimes white/chartreuse depending on the water clarity. Most of the time I prefer to use a 3/8 ounce swim jig, since I rarely fish it deeper than a few feet this time of year and the heavier the bait the less the action.  

 

Rod Selection & Tackle

I have tried many different brands of swim jigs one of the things I like about the confidence tackle supply swim jigs is the stiffer weed guard so I can fish in and through thick cover like tulies and throw it over wood and rarely hang up.  

Since these baits have a stiffer weed guard I opt for a Temple Fork Outfitters 7’3” Heavy action rod GTS C736-1, this rod has an extra fast tip for a quick hook set and plenty of backbone to drive the hook home resulting in more fish making it into the boat.  I pair this with a Shimano Cronarch MGL 6.3:1 reel, spooled with 15# P-Line 100% Fluorocarbon line.  

 

Varying Retrieve Styles 

Swim jigs are a very easy bait to fish most of the time – just throw it out and reel it in like you would a spinnerbait with a steady retrieve. You can also vary the retrieve with intermittent pulses or twitches while you reel it in, or even burn the bait back to the boat if the fish are really active. 

What makes this bait so good is that for one, it’s a swimbait – which presents a natural swimming action and the ability to fish that kind of action in places where it’s difficult to fish most other baits. 

So next time the fish are pushing shallow, pick up a swim jig and don’t be afraid to fish beyond the open water!

 

 

Another Tribute to Lefty

Lefty Kreh passed away nearly two years ago, but memories of fly-fishing’s biggest ambassador endure. The American Museum of Fly Fishing has paid tribute to the long-time TFO advisor with a film — Time — which is expected to be released in a few months.

TFO chatted with Alex Ford of the Museum to discuss the project, which got significant contributions from TFO advisors Flip Pallot, Blane Chocklett and Bob Clouser. All were good friends with Lefty.

Below are excerpts of the interview.

TFO: What was your role in the film? Were you the editor, the producer? Did you come up with the idea. …?

AF: “We knew we wanted to do a film this year. I spent a lot of time looking for a great story that would not only highlight the legacy of fly fishing, but also involve the museum and its collection in Manchester, Vermont. … I remember reading a Fly Fisherman Magazine article that Flip wrote about driving up to Maryland to fish smallmouth streams with Lefty. That was the original idea and then we got the FlyLords crew involved. Then we talked to Flip, and Blane came on board as well. …”

TFO: When will the film be out? For people to see?

AF: “If we can get it in the F3T (the Fly Fishing Film Tour), that would be ideal. It will be finished by October 1st. That’s the deadline for that. Hopefully by early September, we will be ready to go.”

TFO: I know you’re in the editing process right now. How long is the film? Fifteen minutes? 20 minutes? An hour?

AF: “The film will be 10 minutes. Then there will be lots of clips around it. We did interviews with Blane, Flip and Bob Clouser. All were an hour each. We’re going to cut some of that into the main film, but of course we’re going to use that for other stuff as well.”

TFO: I know you’re not finished, but how long did it take to do the project?

AF: “From conception to finish, about a year. A lot of that was coordination and fundraising in the beginning. We shot the actual project in early June. It should be done around mid-September.”

TFO: I know you can’t give anything away in terms of content, but can you give us an idea of the narrative of the film, what people can expect?

AF: “It follows the relationship between Flip and Lefty, how unique that was and also Lefty’s influence on a personal level. Blane for instance ties a Game Changer (fly) on Lefty’s old vise and he fishes with some of his old Deceivers (from the Museum), things like that.”

TFO: Anything that you learned about Lefty that you didn’t know before? Everyone, I know, has a perception of him. It seems like everyone has a story about him. … Is there anything interesting about him that you learned from this project?

AF: “Generally how supportive he was of other people. On a more specific level, there’s a strain of anthrax named after him. He worked in a factory for a number of years. There were three guys who contracted anthrax. The way it manifested itself in him was never seen before. It’s rather unique.”

TFO: When there’s a project, there’s things that make it worthwhile. Anything with this film that made it particularly worthwhile?

AF: “With Bob Clouser, we didn’t know he’d be (near where we made the film), but he happened be staying a few minutes from Flip’s house. For me, it was so cool to be at Flip’s house. Here’s Bob Clouser and Blane Chocklett and we’re talking about Lefty Kreh and Flip as well. That was just amazing, seeing all these heroes in the sport all together to commemorate Lefty who’s a hero to them. It was humbling all around.”

TFO: How much did Flip and Blane help you out? What was their role in all of this?

AF: “They were both great. Blane had a story about the Gummy Minnow and how Lefty got him his first fly deal. They were both excited that the Museum was doing a project like this. They could not have been more accommodating. The first day of filming was intense. We went on for 12 hours. Everyone did what they needed to do to get it done. Then there was Flip with his professionalism in front of the camera. It was amazing. It was like watching an episode of Walker’s Cay Chronicles being made.”

TFO: Anything else you would like to add?

AF: “Lefty’s family donated a lot of his materials, a lot of his estate, to the museum. We have his tying desk. His flies. All sorts of books, DVDs. A lot of cool stuff.”

TFO: What’s the name of the film?

AF: “Right now we’re calling it Time. That came from Flip who said, ‘All I have is time.’ We didn’t plan that one out, but it resonated.’’

 

Comments, questions about the film on Lefty? Feel free to visit one of TFO’s social media pages.

How to Beat the Summer Heat and Catch Fish

As the first stretch of August approaches, it’s time to enjoy the last bit of summer. And if there’s a sliver of free time between time with family and friends, fishing is a great way to relax.
Below are a few summer options to help maximize success, regardless of whether you prefer spinning gear or a fly rod.
Find a Tailwater
Summer brings heat. Fish as a rule, trout, in particular, struggle with higher water temperatures. Tailwater rivers pull cooler water from the bottom of a lake. Fish like consistent water temperature, and the insect hatches tend to be more prolific. The result is big fish that like to eat year-round.
Warmer water temperatures are not as big of a factor in the West, but that’s not the case in the Southeast and East, where anglers are always searching for cooler water. Top tailwaters to try include the Watauga and South Holston in Tennessee, the Nantahala in North Carolina, the Jackson in Virginia. Outside the southeast, there’s the Bighorn in Montana, the Green in Utah, the White in Arkansas, the Farmington in Connecticut and the Arkansas in Colorado.
A good setup for bigger water is TFO’s Axiom II-X paired with a BVK SD reel. Both of these items are set to be be available in October, along with a few of our other new products. A more current big-water option is the Axiom II.
 Try Lake Fishing
River and creek fishing offer more of a definitive roadmap to find fish, assuming you can identify the current seams and structure. Lakes and ponds can be intimidating to the newcomer and therefore are often overlooked. The good thing about stillwater fishing is you can find summer fish, if you learn how to fish cooler, deeper water, which is, in general, where the fish will be holding. Try drop shotting or the countdown method to increase your odds of a quality catch.
Top TFO spin rods to try are the Tactical Bass and Tactical Elite Bass. Both are expected to be available in October. Another good option is our Pacemaker series, designed by TFO advisor and pro tournament angler Cliff Pace.
If you prefer a less technical strategy, target panfish with TFO’s Trout-Panfish rod. They’re perfect for kids and can be caught on spin or fly much of the summer.
Head for the Brine
Freshwater fishing, though doable in the summer, can be tough once July’s swelter arrives. Plan your weekend trip or vacation to your nearest southern coast. Snook, redfish and tarpon, to name a few, are warmwater species. Time the tides right and opportunities abound. The biggest obstacle with saltwater angling is finding the fish. There’s a lot of water, and the fish hold in a mere fraction of it. The best thing you can is do in this instance is hire a guide. Guides have the benefit of local knowledge and will significantly shorten your learning curve on new water.
Get Out of Your Comfort Zone
Many of us are creatures of habit. We fish a certain way when the conditions suit us. Rarely do the stars consistently align with that regimentation. This where it pays to learn a new skill. If you fly fish, pick up a spinning rod. If you spin fish, try to fling a fly. If you’re a dry-fly fisherman, maybe throw a streamer or two for deeper fish. If you love streamers, toss an afternoon grasshopper along the bank. If you like shallow-running crankbaits, try fishing a Carolina rig with a purple worm to get closer to the bottom.
Summer, without question, provides its share of challenges, but there are ample opportunities for the aspiring angler. Try one of the above approaches and let us know how your fared on one of our social media pages.

TFO Unveils New Products

ICAST is over. We at TFO are back home from the trip to Orlando, but if you missed the world’s largest sportfishing show, do not despair.

We introduced quite a few new items at ICAST this year. On the fly side, we welcomed the Axiom II-X fly rod, the NXT Black Label Kit, and the BVK SD. As for spinning gear, we have the Tactical Bass Elite and Tactical Bass series as well as the Professional Walleye series.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a serious fly fisherman or an angler who prefers traditional spinning gear, TFO offers quality options for everyone —- from new anglers just getting started to seasoned professionals.

Here’s a bit more detail about each item, all of which will become available to consumers in the coming months:

The Axiom II-X: The Axiom impressed. Then came the Axiom II, which drew rave reviews. The Axiom II-X has a tough act to follow, but if you want a rod that will deliver a big-time cast without sacrificing accuracy, this satin-blue stick is for you. Retails for ($349.95-$369.95) in weights 5-12. For more info, check out the video below.

The BVK SD: Need a reel to go with your new Axiom II-X? There’s no better choice than the BVK SD. Those who have the BVK swear by it. But get this: The BVK SD offers everything its predecessor did —- with a sealed drag system —- for the same price. Maintenance is minimal, so there’s no more worrying about the interior components. Now they’re fully protected. The BVK SD runs from $199.95-$229.95 and comes in four sizes I, II, III and III+.

NXT Black Label Kit: Fly fishing doesn’t have to be expensive, nor doesn’t it have to be complicated. In essence, that’s the premise behind the NXT Black Label Kit. You get a rod, reel, backing and fly line, all for a very reasonable price ($219.95-$229.95). Since the rod and reel and line are pre-matched, you don’t have to worry about pairing those components, a process that can be intimidating for inexperienced anglers.

Tactical Bass Rods: So you’re a serious bass fisherman. Like to fish topwater? How about crankbaits? Maybe finesse is more your style? If so, our Tactical Bass series ($149.95-$169.95) is for you, no matter how precise your style of angling is.

Tactical Elite Bass Rods:  Whatever profession you choose, you need tools of the trade that will get the job done day after day. So it is with pro anglers and our Tactical Elite series. If you want to make a living fishing, serious tournament fishermen need a rod that will preform consistently day in and day out. By all accounts, our Tactical Elite series ($199.95) more than holds its own.

Professional Walleye Series: One of the biggest challenges in catching walleye is feeling the bite, but our newest walleye series provides enough sensitivity, from the handle to the tip, to help anglers counter this issue. And there’s the added bonus of versatility:  You can jig, rig, crank and troll with this rod ($99.95).

Comments on our new products? Check out one of our social media pages.

TFO Introduces the Axiom II-X Fly Rod

The Axiom II-X was designed for the intermediate to advanced fly angler seeking to maximize accuracy at distance.

Based on the fast action of our renowned TiCrX, we used our highest modulus material and Axiom technology to redefine performance in an extremely powerful fly rod. Unlike other “stiff” rods, the Axiom II-X delivers both the energy necessary for long casts and the incredible tracking and recovery which results in accuracy at distance. If it comes down to one cast, one perfect long cast, this is the fishing tool to do the job.

TFO’s patented and exclusive Axiom technology embeds a double-helix of Kevlar within the blank. The superior tensile strength of the Kevlar acts to buttress the rod’s carbon fiber matrix in compression. The result is that Axiom series fly rods stabilize faster and smoother, absorb shock better and comfortably tolerate over-loading. The angler benefits because Axiom technology virtually eliminates the ability to over power the rod when casting. Bottom line – whether you carry more line in the air or push the rod to the limit, you won’t feel any mushiness – What you will feel is line ripping out of your hand as it launches.

The Axiom II-X series is constructed with high modulus carbon fiber material and an embedded double-helix of Kevlar within the blank all finished in a satin sky blue. The series features premium quality cork handles with burl accents, anodized aluminum up-locking reel seats with carbon fiber inserts. All eight models feature alignment dots color coded by line weight, Recoil guides by REC and ultra-lightweight chromium-impregnated stainless-steel snake guides. All Axiom II-X rods are packaged in a labeled rod sock and rod tube.

Axiom II-X rods are available in 9’ 4-piece configurations from 5 to 12-weight and retail from $349.95-$369.95.

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO): TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, lakes and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork. For more information, please visit: www.tforods.com

Temple Fork Outfitters
Dallas, TX 75247

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters
instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters
twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.

TFO Introduces the Tactical Elite Bass Rods

The Tactical Elite Bass series is our premier level fishing tool for tournament anglers.

Tactical Elite Bass rods optimize technique specific actions with performance maximizing componentry. When success equates to earning a paycheck, Tactical Elite Bass series rods do not compromise on any aspect of design, engineering or manufacturing in order to guarantee anglers performance, consistency and durability.

The foundation of the Tactical Elite Bass series are technique specific fast action blanks constructed with intermediate modulus carbon fiber. The blanks are gun metal grey with Pac Bay Titanium SV guides. The series includes 17 models: 13 casting in 6’10”-7’10” lengths in medium- lights to extra-heavy powers; and 4 spinning in 6’10”-7’3” lengths in medium-light to medium-heavy powers. Componentry includes down- locking graphite feel-through skeletal reel seats for maximum sensitivity with black anodized hoods. All rods include a custom Winn® split grip. Every Tactical Elite Bass rod is designed and manufactured to deliver uncompromising performance and proven durability, then we add the assurance of TFO’s no-fault lifetime warranty.

Tactical Bass rods retail for $199.95.

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO): TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, lakes and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork. For more information, please visit: www.tforods.com

Temple Fork Outfitters
Dallas, TX 75247

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters
instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters
twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.