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Three Basic Casts with Ed Jaworowski

Once you can manage a reasonable forward cast, often called a “pick up and lay down”, you should focus on expanding your repertoire of casts. Due to limited space, I can only describe the basic mechanics of three, but these will hopefully get you started.

ROLL CAST

The roll cast is perhaps the most misunderstood. Fishermen regularly complain that, “My roll cast is terrible; the line splashes down or piles up.” Invariably, traditional instruction is at the root of this problem. We have all heard instructions like “start with the rod at 11:00”, “let the line drape behind you”, “chop down as if using a cleaver or hatchet”, and so on. Such instructions might suffice for casting small flies short distances with a floating line, but to get greater distance, turn over large or heavy flies, or fish sinking lines, they compel us to use excessive force or effort. The reasons are obvious.

First, starting with the line hanging limp behind you represents slack, and you have to get rid of that slack before you can load the rod. Lightly toss the “D-loop” behind you, but start forward before it collapses to the surface. You only need a short piece of line (the “anchor”) actually on the surface when you begin the stroke, so have the end of the line no farther in front of you than approximately a rod length or so when you start forward. Finally, since the line must continue traveling in the direction the tip Is moving (not where it is pointing) when the rod straightens, stroke forward, not downward. You want the line to unroll in the air above the water rather than roll across the surface, except in one special case. This may call for starting with the rod tip well to the rear, even pointing straight back for very long casts. This allows you to make a longer stroke, and will load the rod more deeply into the butt with no extra effort.

Lefty Kreh demonstrates why chopping down on the roll cast is poor advice. Most of the energy goes downward, instead of forward; the loop is very large, wastes a lot of energy, and will pile up at the end unless you use excessive force. Photo: Ed Jaworowski
Note this exceptionally efficient and tight loop as it unrolls toward the target. The keys are: starting with the rod pointed well to the rear; stroking the rod forward, not downward; very fast but smooth final acceleration to an instant stop. Photo: Ed Jaworowski

CURVE CASTS

Aside from a straight forward cast and a roll cast, curve casts have more applications in many fishing situations than any other. Understand that what the hand does at the end of the stroke, the rod tip will duplicate; the line and fly will in turn replicate that. So, if you want the line to curve, you must make the tip curve as the rod straightens. These photos and explanations demonstrate just two of several ways to make this happen, whether casting sidearm or overhead. In either case, avoid stroking downward toward the water.

Here, I cast sidearm, applying a little more effort than the cast would normally call for. The excess energy causes the line to curve to my left, around the tree stump. Casting left-handed, which is quite simple, will allow the line to curve from the opposite side. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

Making the line curve with an overhead cast, when conditions call for that, is a bit trickier, but if you sharply turn your knuckles to the right or left the instant before stopping, the rod tip and, ultimately, the line and fly will do the same.

In this example, I sharply turned my hand to the right at the very end of the stroke. The line unrolled straight ahead between the trees, then the leader and popper sharply snapped to the right, behind the tree. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

REACH CAST

While a curve cast calls for modification during the actual execution of the casting stroke, the reach cast introduces an additional motion after your hand stops and the rod straightens. There are a number of applications for this cast. One example, say you want to cast a dry fly directly upstream beyond a trout, but must avoid having the line fall over the fish and spook it. If conditions won’t allow you to move to a better position, a reach cast can solve your problem.

Stop the rod tip going directly toward the target but, while the line is unrolling in the air, continually and steadily swing the rod off to the right or left. It is crucial however, that you keep feeding line with your line hand while making the reach maneuver. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

 

When executed properly, the fly will go directly to the target, but the line will fall to the water well to the side. The rod will be pointing at 90 degrees to the direction of the cast, as if you had cast from a position 9 or 10 feet to the right or left. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

TACKLE

While skill is more important than tackle when casting, better designed tools will help greatly. Of course, personal choices come into play; here are mine. For heavier warm- and saltwater fishing, calling say for 8 to 12-weights, my decided favorite is the Axiom 2-X. Due to its higher modulus and Kevlar double-helix, it tracks, unloads, and stabilizes more efficiently, with less vibration, than any rod I have ever cast. Period. This makes for easier longer casts, as well as those described above, especially with larger and heavier flies, and with minimal false casting. For lighter (i.e., 3 to 7-weight) fishing, I rely on the quick, light, and durable LK Legacy. It’s ideally suited for all anglers when situations call for accurate and delicate presentations.

For much more detailed explanations of these and many other casts, I suggest you consult The Complete Cast, the four-hour instructional DVD/Blu-Ray from TFO, on which Lefty Kreh and I collaborated, and my newly-released Perfecting the Cast (Stackpole Books), which summarizes what I learned from my 45 years of coaching.

Revisiting “Made for The Outdoors: Hows Its Made – TFO Rods” with Bill Sherck

Not many anglers actually know about the process of how they’re fishing rods are made. Luckily, in 2017, we had the opportunity to partner up with Sportsman Channel’s Made For The Outdoors TV  to show the world exactly how both TFO fly and conventional rods are made. If you haven’t seen both of these videos, do yourself a favor and check them out below. The amount of detail, time, and focus that goes into each step of the rod building process is incredible, and we are honored to have such a hard working and talented team that makes it all happen.

We recently connected with TFO Ambassador and Made For The Outdoors TV host Bill Sherck to revisit these videos and his trip overseas to where TFO rods are born.

What still stands out to you the most about your visit to the South Korea factory where both the fly and conventional rods are made?

There are a bunch of things that stand out about the trip. First off, BJ is the most passionate rod builder I have ever met. He is a very technical guy who understands all the engineering and hi-tech materials, all the stuff that regular anglers don’t always comprehend or appreciate…But more importantly, BJ loves to fish! He has so many GREAT fish stories from his adventures. You can tell that passion translates into how BJ and his team build rods.  I’m talking about the tapers for all kinds of specific species of fish, how each rod feels in hand, how each rod looks.  

Conventional Category Manager Jim Shulin with TFO’s rod engineer B.J.

This is TFO’s facility. This isn’t some place where builders manufacture a bunch of rods and throw in TFO’s order when it comes through. BJ and his team build only TFO rods.  That is why these rods are so darn perfect.

The other very special part of our trip was watching BJ’s crew build each rod.   They are handcrafted.  From the hand cutting of the materials to shaping blanks to painting and building grips. Each station and each step of the process was so much fun to watch. I loved the discerning eyes. It seemed like every person was always looking at details.   

The crew is definitely a closer-knit family than any other place I’ve been. They work hard and they play hard.  Literally! The team works together, and then they take a mid-day break and walk to lunch together where they eat as a team (I believe BJ provides their meals) and then they walk back to the facility and grind out games of ping pong and checkers before getting back to rod building. 

Of all the steps and processes involved, what surprised you the most? Was there a procedure in rod making that you never thought would have been a part of the process?

It was funny, but I was wandering around the facility and discovered a complete guide wrapping/rod wrapping area sitting in the dark collecting dust.  Why in the world…Because BJ had good friends across town who are the best in the business at wrapping guides. BJ shares that part of the rod building process with those people. I love that every day, TFO drives completed blanks over to their friends who wrap and finish all of the guides and then drive those completed rods back to TFO for final assembly.  A very cool part of the process to experience (outside of the dried fish sitting on all the wrapping machines.  Turns out it’s a sign of good luck for those employees).

BJ and the TFO team take great pride in where they build the rods.  Incheon/Seoul area is a global manufacturing hub know for some of the world’s biggest technology names.  Samsung, Kia, SAP.  TFO fits right in. They don’t pretend to make the most rods, but they are absolutely convinced they make the best and they do so with the most passion.

TFO Holiday Gift Ideas – 2020 Edition

It’s hard to believe we’re already upon the holiday season, but here we are again! If you’re having trouble finding the right gift for the angler in your life, we’ve put together a list of items that won’t break the bank, but will be sure to be a great surprise for the recipient.

TFO Apparel – New Items Added!

Just in time for the holidays, the TFO Apparel Store has added some new items! Rep your favorite rod company with a TFO t-shirt, hat/beanie, baseball tee, hoodie/jacket and more!

tforods.com/swag

Lefty Kreh Koozie, Decal & Poster Pack

Add some inspiration to your fly tying room/area with a little bit of Lefty Kreh.

Lefty Kreh will always be a legend in the world of fishing. He was a true original and he helped TFO pioneer the concept of affordable high-performance fly rods. At Temple Fork Outfitters, we’re forever grateful for all that he gave of himself to us and our favorite sport.

Lefty regularly shared his passion in the way of teaching and in being kind to others, which often lit a fire in the hearts of those that knew him. That’s why above being a great angler, we remember him as a great friend and hope you’ll find this pack of Lefty Kreh nostalgia as a way to remember him as we do: smiling.

Artwork by Paul Puckett. Get your koozie, decal and poster pack while supplies last. Fish the Original ™

Decal Dimensions: 4″ x 5″ | Poster Dimensions: 16″ x 20″

https://tforods.com/lefty-kreh-pack/

Reel Case, Rod Tubes, Rod & Reel Carriers

Whether on a boat, car or plane, transporting your gear while keeping it protected from damages is extremely important. Keep you gear safe with a rod tube, rod/reel carriers, and reel cover.

https://tforods.com/fly-rod-reel-cases/

BVK-SD Reel

We can’t always predict where fish will be, but we can do our best to be prepared to get to any depth that fish might be holding. This is where having a different type of line (full sink, sink tip, intermediate, floating) comes in hand, and if you have another line, you’re going to need another reel (or backup spool) to hold it. The BVK-SD is a great primary and/or back up reel. The sealed drag functionality gives you even more confidence for playing bigger fish when needed.

https://tforods.com/bvk-sd-reels/

Traveler

While this year may not have been a great year to travel, 2021 is looking a lot more promising. Whether you’re just looking for a compact fishing rod to transport to the lake, or if you’re looking for a great inshore rod to take with you on the plane for your beach trip, but don’t want to worry about traveling with a one-piece rod, the Traveler is an excellent, and reliable choice.

https://tforods.com/traveler-rods/

TFO Pro Staffer COfishBRO Talks Professional Walleye

TFO Pro Staffer and Colorado based angler Chris Edlin loves to do two things: fishing and filming fishing videos for his Youtube channel – COfishBRO.

Chris has been fishing TFO fly rods for years now for trout on his local Colorado rivers, but he also spends a fair amount of his time on the water pursuing walleye and smallmouth using TFO’s conventional gear. Here’s a little bit more info from Chris…

My name is Chris Edlin and I started the YouTube channel COfishBro back in 2016 to focus on angling in Colorado.  

I primarily fish for walleye on the front-range out of my 1999 Ranger 620 but I often found myself in the winter time stripping a 5wt fly line for cutbows and browns on some of Colorado’s premier gold medal waters. 

Our channel focuses on fishing tactics and knowledge, as I always have believed the more you know about fish behavior the better you will be suited for targeting them on the water. 

I fished TFO fly rods for a number of years on the river for trout and always wanted to give the conventional side a try. The tactics I use for summer walleye are not very traditional and they require a powerful and ultra sensitive rod to get right.

 

The cadence is key, getting the proper stroke and rhythm to the retrieve is what causes these fish to bite while presenting a fairly heavy ice fishing lure called a Jigging Rap. The TFO Professional Walleye rods have been the best addition to my arsenal in presenting these baits.

Particularly, I prefer the 6′ 6″ Medium Fast Action. This rod has plenty of backbone when throwing a size 7 rap (5/8 ounce) and the fast tip makes the lure jump horizontally very erratically but staying consistently only a few inches off the bottom. That is key to staying in the strike zone and the whole idea behind this technique. These rods were built on sensitivity and that’s what shines through whether you are live bait rigging or hucking plastics on humps and ridges. These rods are built tough, and does it hurt to have a rod that looks as good as it performs? My clients don’t seem to mind!

If you have any questions please feel free to reach out to me via email or any of my socials. I’m constantly learning and find we as humans learn best when we gather each other’s perspectives. Listed here are a few other videos that are tailored towards education and simplifying your day on the water, whether the goal is to catch more fish or impress your friends. I hope to encourage you to become the best angler you can be because no matter how many fish we catch, it will never be enough! 

Here are some more videos and reviews from COfishBRO on TFO gear. Be sure to like and follow his channel to support a fellow TFO angler!

Plotting A New Course – A Film with Flip Pallot

In this uncertain year that 2020 has been, we check in with TFO National Advisor Flip Pallot down in the deep woods near his home in South Florida.

Flip Pallot has been apart of the TFO family as a National Advisor since 2006.

Flip was born and raised in South Florida. An avid outdoorsman for as long as he could remember, Flip began his career as a banker, for “way too long” according to him. After finding the courage to leave the corporate world, Flip began his second career as a fishing and hunting guide. After 12 years Flip moved to television producing and bringing his life’s fishing travels to the small screen for us to enjoy. He is best known for bringing us the Walkers Cay Chronicles, which aired for 16 seasons on ESPN and as a founder of Hell’s Bay Boatworks.

Flip’s keen sense for storytelling and bringing to life the best part of fishing adventures has continued with teaching instructional classes and writing books on fly fishing.

Flip helped us design the Mangrove series of fly rods, and last year, helped us in creating one of our most popular fly rods – the Axiom ll-X (also seen in this video).

You can find out more about Flip here:

http://www.flippallot.com

https://www.facebook.com/flippallot

https://www.instagram.com/flippallot/

 

 

More Down Under Than Down Under – A Trip Of A Lifetime by Jason Randall

About as low as you can go short of Antarctica, Cape Horn, Chile overlooks the bottom of the world. Yes, even further south than Australia and Tasmania. I never realized just how far it was until we finished the fourth plane ride and nearly twenty-eight hours of travel. The planes grew smaller with each successive flight and landed at smaller, more remote and less populated airports. In my book, that’s a good way to know you’re going someplace special. The final stop was little more than an asphalt airstrip.

Some clues that that we weren’t in Kansas anymore greeted us upon arrival; the obvious language difference, a few cultural changes and the fact that southerly winds brought cold air which blasted us as we deplaned. Other dissimilarities came as welcome surprises over the coming days as we ventured into a totally unique environment. One delightful discovery; the night sky looked different. A lot different. You could see the Southern Cross.

Our group of nine intrepid travelers included Jo, my wife, proficient angler and our groups photographer, our son, Evan, and good friends, Dan Pesavento, Stan Diment, Dick and Danny Gebhart, Dean Williams and Sara Lyle, all looking forward to a week at the end of the world and the opportunity to helicopter into some of the most remote rivers imaginable to fish for giant brook trout, sea run and resident brown trout. We’d been excited for this trip for the two years we’d been planning it.

Rafael Gonzales, the manager of Lakutaia Lodge, and two guides, both named Felipe, met us in Punta Arenas and flew the final leg to Navarrino Island and welcomed us to the luxurious lodge. We gathered together for evening cocktails to enjoy Sebastian tending bar, serving Pisco Sours, the local favorite drink that to me, seemed one part pina colada, one part whiskey sour and one part baseball bat that would sneak up and smack you in the head after the third one.

The following morning, the helicopter rose from a self inflicted whirlwind of churning leaves and dust that would remove the hats of those who watched and awaited their turn in the air taxi. It touched down on the shores of a different river each day and deposited groups of three anglers and a guide who scuttled beneath the turning blades and then waved as the pilot lifted off to fly back to the lodge in order to ferry the next group to their river.

By the second day, we’d all taken a deep, relaxing breath- more of a sigh actually, and settled into the lifestyle of gourmet food, fine drink, evening conversations and a new place to fish each day. It’s a joy to watch each person unwind the knots that daily life so often binds around us and settle into their own harmony and rhythm. For some, it meant a half hour nap after lunch by the stream. For others, just a quiet midmorning respite at the waters edge just to take in the moment. Danny and Evan, being the younger of our group, were also the most hard core anglers. While many of the rest of us were leaning or napping against the tree, these two were back on the water catching fish.

Streamers produced in the early morning hours. The six weight Axiom ll-X excelled at casting small streamers to bank-side lies. Charlie Craven’s Double Gonna elicited some voracious strikes. Evan switched to a Mr. Hankey, a simple mouse pattern in the late afternoons on his five weight Axiom ll with exciting success. One morning, Felipe Ignacio Kovacic tried his hand an Euronymphing with TFO’s soon-to-be-released nymphing rod- the Stealth. Fortunately, I had a prototype with me and we had a blast together. Each night, Sebastian met us in the wader room after the helicopter ride back to the lodge with Pisco Sours and a full tray of appetizers.

I don’t remember who caught the largest fish; I know it wasn’t me. Maybe its was Stan, or possibly Dean. Sara caught more fish than she ever had before. It was special to see Dick and his son Danny fish together. My favorite memory with Dan was huddled behind a sparse clump of bushes waiting out a snow squall. Evan and Jo caught the largest brook trouts of their lives.

Of course, the week ended too soon as we gathered for a festive barbecue on the final night, complete with flayed lamb over a wood fire and an assortment of tasty local appetizers. And of course, Sebastian manning the bar. We celebrated new friends and old friends joined by our common passion.

If you ever get the chance to go to Lakutaia Lodge in the southern most part of Chile- don’t miss it. You’ll make memories of a lifetime, see a remote and beautiful part of the world, and a lot of Patagonia waders and TFO rods and reels- the workhorses of the lodge. Have fun, but of course, beware of that third Pisco Sour.

 

Blog post written by TFO National Advisor Jason Randall and photos provided by Jo Randall.

 

TFO Announces 2021 Fly Category Products

This week, Temple Fork Outfitters announced four new additions to the TFO family of fly rods: the Stealth, the Blue Ribbon, the LK Legacy and the LK Legacy TH. These rods are available now!

Stealth Fly Rod Series

Euro nymphing is one of the most talked about–and effective– techniques for trout anglers, and we’ve used all the information shared to us by our dealers and those in the “know,” to develop the Stealth series of rods.

Designed for anglers the need the perfect tool to dead drift nymphs in small riffles and tiny pools – the often overlooked lies where trout feed.

The Stealth series provide anglers a rod with the accuracy, quick recovery and overall balance to repeatedly hit specific lies and bring fish to hand.

The Stealth series is offered in a four-piece, 10 foot, two weight and a 10-foot, six-inch, three weight. Stealth rod weigh, 2.8 and 3.2 ounces respectively are finished with machined, cut aluminum reel seats and black, single-foot snake guides.

All Stealth rods come with a rod sock and tube, and retail for $299.

 


Blue Ribbon Fly Rod Series

Introducing the all new Blue Ribbon Fly Rod Series. Designed for fly anglers that need a rod to cover a range of trout and warm water techniques from small flies, hopper-dropper rigs, indicators or big streamers for trout, bass and carp.

Very technical, magnum taper trout rods are not always the right choice for all anglers in real fishing situations. A rod that anglers can feel load and that can represent an efficient and accurate cast, (especially in small rivers, out of drift or along a lake shore) is what the Blue Ribbon provides.

The medium-fast action, Blue Ribbon series is offered in a two-weight, through seven-weight, in lengths of seven-foot, six-inches to 10-feet.

All Blue Ribbon rods come with a rod sock and tube and retail for $239-$259.

 

 

LK Legacy Fly Rod Series

The NEW LK Legacy series is designed and built as an evolution to the BVK series and a homage to fly fishing legend, Lefty Kreh.

Designed for the intermediate to advanced caster, the fast action LK Legacy utilizes a mix of new materials that dramatically reduces the weight while creating an aggressive blend of power and strength  – excelling in presentation and distance.

The LK Legacy single hand series is offered in a 3-weight, through 8-weight. in length of 8-feet to 10-feet. All rods come with a rod sock and rod rube and retail from $269-$299.

 

LK Legacy Two-Handed Fly Rod Series

Built off the same componentry as the LK Legacy single hand series. The fast action LK Legacy two-handed series is offered in a four-piece configuration in a 6-weight through 8-weight, in lengths 11-feet, six inches to 13 feet, six inches.

LK Legacy Two-Handed rods feature both a grain window and gram rating for easy line pairing.

All LK Legacy TH rods come with a rod sock and tube, and retail for $399-$409.

 

Once again, these new rods are available now! To see our entire catalog of fly fishing products, click here.

Check Out The Winner & Finalists of the TFO Photo Contest!

That’s a wrap for our first ever TFO Photo Contest! Over the past few weeks we received around 500 entries, and we loved seeing so many anglers enjoying TFO gear on their favorite waters.

This Monday, our team selected our Top Six photos for a public vote to help select the winner of the $1000 in TFO gear.

After almost 1,000 votes, we had a stand out winner – John McCarthy and his shot of the Inshore spinning rod! Second place was Brandon Genova’s shot of the Tactical Elite Bass, but not far behind was Adam Koontz’s shot of the Finesse Trout.

Congrats to all the photographers who made the finals! Check out the poll standing below, as well as stories from each of the finalist photographers about each of their finalist submissions!

 

1st Place – John McCarthy – Inshore 

The picture was taken by the Stonebridge in Onset, MA right by my house. The bigger stripers had just started coming in so I figured I’d throw a few casts before I went to work.

What attracted me to the TFO Inshore Mag XH was the versatility the rod had to offer. It just looked like a lot of fun, and it is!!!

Find out more about the Inshore here!


2nd Place – Brandon Genova – Tactical Elite Bass

This shot was taken at Barr Lake State Park here in Colorado. The clouds and sky that day were amazing. My buddy and I were bass fishing that day. Our first time at this location actually. The rod I had just purchased was this TFO Tactical Elite Bass 7-5 H I believe. I’ve been fishing TFO rods going on for 6 years now.

Being a tournament angler, I’m hard on my gear. I’ve found that TFO rods are by far the most durable, and the sensitivity is unbelievable.

When I started using them, I actually had to take time adjust to them versus my previous rods. They were so sensitive I was actually setting the hook too early!

Find out more about the Tactical Elite Bass here!

3rd Place – Adam Koontz – Finesse Trout

During this shot, I was in Northern New Jersey casting small dries for brookies on one of the many native brook trout streams.

I like the TFO Trout Finesse for its ability to handle delicate presentations and for its sensitivity. There are days that you’re not out searching for a fish of a lifetime, and this rod handles small streams and brooks perfectly!

Find out more about the Trout Finesse & Glass here!

4th Place – Robert Ledezma – Axiom ll 8wt w/ Streamers

This shot was taken on the banks of the Henry’s Fork near Ashton, Idaho. I was after big brown trout looking for a big meal. This is actually the river where I first started fly fishing many years ago so it’s a special place for me. Some of my biggest fish and favorite memories have been here.

A lot has changed since I started fly fishing and I’ve gone through a lot of different rods and gear. I’m not entirely sure when or how this happened but the Axiom II has easily become my go-to rod. There’s just something about rigging this rod up with a big streamer that feels right. We’ve gone through a lot of battles together and it has never let me down. I can trust the rod to do its part as I can only try to do mine.

No matter what adventure I go on the Axiom II always comes with me!

Find out more about the Axiom ll here!

5th Place – Aubrey Breed – Mangrove & Cutthroat

The shot was taken on Yellowstone Lake in the Yellowstone National Park fishing for cutthroat trout with streamers! I absolutely love the versatility of the Mangrove!

It’s great for chucking meaty streamers, and also works well in saltwater. It’s got a really smooth action and makes for great long casts!

Find out more about the Mangrove here!

 

6th Place – Mark Kolanowski – Axiom ll Meets Striped Bass

My image of the Axiom II rod and Striped Bass was made in Texas on the Brazos River below the Morris Sheppard Dam which forms Possum Kingdom Lake above it. When the flows are right, the fishing for Striped and White Bass can be very good! This particular fish was caught by my good friend and fishing buddy Craig Rucker on a pink, purple, and white Lunch Money streamer.

I actually do not own this Axiom II rod – Although I do own 7 TFO fly rods in my quiver from a 3wt Finesse to an 8wt BVK. Craig did let me make a few casts with his new 10wt Axiom II. He had gotten it for an upcoming trip we were taking to Alaska and wanted to give it a try on our local river. It proved to be a great choice. The Brazos River Striped Bass we were targeting like big weighted streamers.  Long casts are needed to get the flies up towards the dam and bigger flows where the Stripers roam in search of shad.

The Axiom II had the backbone and power to deliver the big flies into the wind that is ever present in Texas. The swing weight was comfortable even on a big 10wt rod . The power in the butt section was there to keep a hooked fish out of the underwater boulder field, stiff current, and into the net!

Nice rod ! It’s the next one I’ll be adding to my TFO collection.

Find out more about the Axiom ll here!

THANK YOU to ALL those who submitted their photos to the first ever TFO Photo Contest. As difficult as it was to narrow down to our Top Six, it was such a joy to see how everyone enjoys using their TFO gear and we look forward to seeing more photos down the road.

Keep taking those TFO photos and stay tuned for more giveaways and contests down the rod!

#tforods #fishtheoriginal

 

TFO Photo Contest Finalists Have Been Chosen!

Thank you to all the entrants of the our first ever TFO Photo Contest!

We received around 500 entries and as hard as it was to narrow down to our Top Six, we loved seeing so many anglers enjoying TFO gear on their favorite waters!

Help us pick the winner of the $1,000 in TFO gear by voting below on your favorite entry.

Voting ends this Thursday at Midnight EST. We’ll announce the winner on Friday at 12pm EST.

Thank you to all who entered! Stay tuned for more giveaways and contests in 2020.

 

Photo #1 by John McCarthy

TFO Inshore 

Photo #2 by Brandon Genova

Tactical Elite Bass

Photo #3 by Robert Ledezma

Axiom ll

Photo #4 by Mark Kolanowski

Axiom ll 

Photo #5 by Aubrey Breed

Mangrove

Photo #6 by Adam Koontz

Finesse Trout

Vote Here!

This poll is no longer accepting votes

Who do you feel is the TFO 2020 Photo Contest winner?

TFO Pro Staffer Capt. Jonathan Moss Launches The Captain’s Log

In case you missed one of our recent shares on social media, Florida based TFO Pro Staff angler Capt. Jonathan Moss has a new video series that just launched — The Captain’s Log with Waypoint TV. Check out the trailers for Episode 1 & 2  below.

The series follows host Capt. Jonathan Moss on an educational expedition through Florida and all its vast and beautiful estuaries. Throughout the series, we’ll follow Moss and his crew as they target both inshore and offshore species and learn a few tricks and tactics along the way.

Between guiding with clients and shooting for this series, the TFO Inshore is Jonathan’s Go-To for pretty much all the fishing he does, but when heading out for offshore and targeting big game, Moss switches over to the Seahunter series.

We decided to check in with Jonathan to get some more feedback on the Inshore – along with and what his crew and clients have been saying about these TFO rods.

 

TFO: Looks like you guys are using the Inshore a lot through The Captain’s Log! What do you like about the Inshore? 

JM: The TFO Inshore series rods are the perfect combination of light weight, all day fishability with enough backbone to go toe to toe with fish and win! In addition to the Inshore series’ performance is Its eye appeal! The TFO Inshore rods are aesthetically pleasing with high quality rod components and that catchy blue color! 

 

TFO: Do you have a Go-To size/model?

JM: The TFO Inshore series rods have a wide variety of rod lengths, powers and actions from which to choose! For shallow water sight fishing, my go to inshore rod is the 7ft medium power fast action rod, paired with a 3000 series reel and 10lb braided line. That setup will allow anglers to cast a soft plastic or live bait both a long distance and accurately. That combination is the key to sight casting leery fish on the flats. When the conversation turns to big tarpon, my go to TFO inshore rod is the 8ft Mag Heavy Fast Action rod paired with a 6000 series reel with 50lb braided line. A longer rod means further casting and the backbone of the mag heavy rod gives me confidence in battling the Silver King.

Lastly, I always have an extra 8ft mag heavy combo ready and rigged with a large bucktail jig for the unexpected visit from a Cobia! 

TFO: You’ve mentioned that The Captain’s Log will feature a few offshore episodes where you guys switch over to the Seahunter series. What do you like about The Seahunter compared to other offshore rods?

JM: The TFO Seahunter rods are very impressive. When fishing offshore wrecks and reefs, anglers need a rod and reel combo to keep fish from turning their heads back towards the bottom structure. Big fish such as varieties of Groupers, snappers and amberjacks are notorious for breaking lines on structure. The Seahunter series time and time again proves it’s worth as a part of my offshore arsenal by giving the angler the edge over these powerful reef dwellers! When fishing competitively or commercially as a full time guide, I need rods that will hold up to the test of big fish every day and the Seahunter Series rods from TFO gets the job done!

 

TFO: Do you have a Go-To size/model for this series as well?

JM: Rod selection is dependent on style of fishing. For vertical jigging, my go to is the 7ft 30 power rod paired with a 6000 series reel and 50lb braided line. For dropping live grunts over rock piles for groupers and snappers, my go to is the 6ft 6inch 40 power rod paired with an 8000 series reel and 60lb braided line. 

You just can’t beat these rods for offshore fishing! 

 

 

TFO: What has been the response from your clients and other people that have fished with you about TFO products (Inshore, Seahunter, others)?

JM: I am blessed to be able to make a living on the water! Part of my success has been quality gear. My rods and reels get abused every day and still look and feel like new. It’s a testament to the quality put in to each TFO rod on my boat. From fly rods to inshore to offshore, my clients only get the best that TFO offers. I hear it all the time, “where can I get a fishing rod just like this one?” My clients are quickly making the change to TFO because they recognize the performance, durability and quality of TFO rods. 

 

Keep up with Capt. Jonathan Moss and his crew on the latest episodes of The Captain’s Log here

To find out more information on Jonathan or to book a trip with his guiding service (GoCastaway), you can visit his website here.