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More Down Under Than Down Under – A Trip Of A Lifetime by Jason Randall

About as low as you can go short of Antarctica, Cape Horn, Chile overlooks the bottom of the world. Yes, even further south than Australia and Tasmania. I never realized just how far it was until we finished the fourth plane ride and nearly twenty-eight hours of travel. The planes grew smaller with each successive flight and landed at smaller, more remote and less populated airports. In my book, that’s a good way to know you’re going someplace special. The final stop was little more than an asphalt airstrip.

Some clues that that we weren’t in Kansas anymore greeted us upon arrival; the obvious language difference, a few cultural changes and the fact that southerly winds brought cold air which blasted us as we deplaned. Other dissimilarities came as welcome surprises over the coming days as we ventured into a totally unique environment. One delightful discovery; the night sky looked different. A lot different. You could see the Southern Cross.

Our group of nine intrepid travelers included Jo, my wife, proficient angler and our groups photographer, our son, Evan, and good friends, Dan Pesavento, Stan Diment, Dick and Danny Gebhart, Dean Williams and Sara Lyle, all looking forward to a week at the end of the world and the opportunity to helicopter into some of the most remote rivers imaginable to fish for giant brook trout, sea run and resident brown trout. We’d been excited for this trip for the two years we’d been planning it.

Rafael Gonzales, the manager of Lakutaia Lodge, and two guides, both named Felipe, met us in Punta Arenas and flew the final leg to Navarrino Island and welcomed us to the luxurious lodge. We gathered together for evening cocktails to enjoy Sebastian tending bar, serving Pisco Sours, the local favorite drink that to me, seemed one part pina colada, one part whiskey sour and one part baseball bat that would sneak up and smack you in the head after the third one.

The following morning, the helicopter rose from a self inflicted whirlwind of churning leaves and dust that would remove the hats of those who watched and awaited their turn in the air taxi. It touched down on the shores of a different river each day and deposited groups of three anglers and a guide who scuttled beneath the turning blades and then waved as the pilot lifted off to fly back to the lodge in order to ferry the next group to their river.

By the second day, we’d all taken a deep, relaxing breath- more of a sigh actually, and settled into the lifestyle of gourmet food, fine drink, evening conversations and a new place to fish each day. It’s a joy to watch each person unwind the knots that daily life so often binds around us and settle into their own harmony and rhythm. For some, it meant a half hour nap after lunch by the stream. For others, just a quiet midmorning respite at the waters edge just to take in the moment. Danny and Evan, being the younger of our group, were also the most hard core anglers. While many of the rest of us were leaning or napping against the tree, these two were back on the water catching fish.

Streamers produced in the early morning hours. The six weight Axiom ll-X excelled at casting small streamers to bank-side lies. Charlie Craven’s Double Gonna elicited some voracious strikes. Evan switched to a Mr. Hankey, a simple mouse pattern in the late afternoons on his five weight Axiom ll with exciting success. One morning, Felipe Ignacio Kovacic tried his hand an Euronymphing with TFO’s soon-to-be-released nymphing rod- the Stealth. Fortunately, I had a prototype with me and we had a blast together. Each night, Sebastian met us in the wader room after the helicopter ride back to the lodge with Pisco Sours and a full tray of appetizers.

I don’t remember who caught the largest fish; I know it wasn’t me. Maybe its was Stan, or possibly Dean. Sara caught more fish than she ever had before. It was special to see Dick and his son Danny fish together. My favorite memory with Dan was huddled behind a sparse clump of bushes waiting out a snow squall. Evan and Jo caught the largest brook trouts of their lives.

Of course, the week ended too soon as we gathered for a festive barbecue on the final night, complete with flayed lamb over a wood fire and an assortment of tasty local appetizers. And of course, Sebastian manning the bar. We celebrated new friends and old friends joined by our common passion.

If you ever get the chance to go to Lakutaia Lodge in the southern most part of Chile- don’t miss it. You’ll make memories of a lifetime, see a remote and beautiful part of the world, and a lot of Patagonia waders and TFO rods and reels- the workhorses of the lodge. Have fun, but of course, beware of that third Pisco Sour.

 

Blog post written by TFO National Advisor Jason Randall and photos provided by Jo Randall.

 

Check Out The Winner & Finalists of the TFO Photo Contest!

That’s a wrap for our first ever TFO Photo Contest! Over the past few weeks we received around 500 entries, and we loved seeing so many anglers enjoying TFO gear on their favorite waters.

This Monday, our team selected our Top Six photos for a public vote to help select the winner of the $1000 in TFO gear.

After almost 1,000 votes, we had a stand out winner – John McCarthy and his shot of the Inshore spinning rod! Second place was Brandon Genova’s shot of the Tactical Elite Bass, but not far behind was Adam Koontz’s shot of the Finesse Trout.

Congrats to all the photographers who made the finals! Check out the poll standing below, as well as stories from each of the finalist photographers about each of their finalist submissions!

 

1st Place – John McCarthy – Inshore 

The picture was taken by the Stonebridge in Onset, MA right by my house. The bigger stripers had just started coming in so I figured I’d throw a few casts before I went to work.

What attracted me to the TFO Inshore Mag XH was the versatility the rod had to offer. It just looked like a lot of fun, and it is!!!

Find out more about the Inshore here!


2nd Place – Brandon Genova – Tactical Elite Bass

This shot was taken at Barr Lake State Park here in Colorado. The clouds and sky that day were amazing. My buddy and I were bass fishing that day. Our first time at this location actually. The rod I had just purchased was this TFO Tactical Elite Bass 7-5 H I believe. I’ve been fishing TFO rods going on for 6 years now.

Being a tournament angler, I’m hard on my gear. I’ve found that TFO rods are by far the most durable, and the sensitivity is unbelievable.

When I started using them, I actually had to take time adjust to them versus my previous rods. They were so sensitive I was actually setting the hook too early!

Find out more about the Tactical Elite Bass here!

3rd Place – Adam Koontz – Finesse Trout

During this shot, I was in Northern New Jersey casting small dries for brookies on one of the many native brook trout streams.

I like the TFO Trout Finesse for its ability to handle delicate presentations and for its sensitivity. There are days that you’re not out searching for a fish of a lifetime, and this rod handles small streams and brooks perfectly!

Find out more about the Trout Finesse & Glass here!

4th Place – Robert Ledezma – Axiom ll 8wt w/ Streamers

This shot was taken on the banks of the Henry’s Fork near Ashton, Idaho. I was after big brown trout looking for a big meal. This is actually the river where I first started fly fishing many years ago so it’s a special place for me. Some of my biggest fish and favorite memories have been here.

A lot has changed since I started fly fishing and I’ve gone through a lot of different rods and gear. I’m not entirely sure when or how this happened but the Axiom II has easily become my go-to rod. There’s just something about rigging this rod up with a big streamer that feels right. We’ve gone through a lot of battles together and it has never let me down. I can trust the rod to do its part as I can only try to do mine.

No matter what adventure I go on the Axiom II always comes with me!

Find out more about the Axiom ll here!

5th Place – Aubrey Breed – Mangrove & Cutthroat

The shot was taken on Yellowstone Lake in the Yellowstone National Park fishing for cutthroat trout with streamers! I absolutely love the versatility of the Mangrove!

It’s great for chucking meaty streamers, and also works well in saltwater. It’s got a really smooth action and makes for great long casts!

Find out more about the Mangrove here!

 

6th Place – Mark Kolanowski – Axiom ll Meets Striped Bass

My image of the Axiom II rod and Striped Bass was made in Texas on the Brazos River below the Morris Sheppard Dam which forms Possum Kingdom Lake above it. When the flows are right, the fishing for Striped and White Bass can be very good! This particular fish was caught by my good friend and fishing buddy Craig Rucker on a pink, purple, and white Lunch Money streamer.

I actually do not own this Axiom II rod – Although I do own 7 TFO fly rods in my quiver from a 3wt Finesse to an 8wt BVK. Craig did let me make a few casts with his new 10wt Axiom II. He had gotten it for an upcoming trip we were taking to Alaska and wanted to give it a try on our local river. It proved to be a great choice. The Brazos River Striped Bass we were targeting like big weighted streamers.  Long casts are needed to get the flies up towards the dam and bigger flows where the Stripers roam in search of shad.

The Axiom II had the backbone and power to deliver the big flies into the wind that is ever present in Texas. The swing weight was comfortable even on a big 10wt rod . The power in the butt section was there to keep a hooked fish out of the underwater boulder field, stiff current, and into the net!

Nice rod ! It’s the next one I’ll be adding to my TFO collection.

Find out more about the Axiom ll here!

THANK YOU to ALL those who submitted their photos to the first ever TFO Photo Contest. As difficult as it was to narrow down to our Top Six, it was such a joy to see how everyone enjoys using their TFO gear and we look forward to seeing more photos down the road.

Keep taking those TFO photos and stay tuned for more giveaways and contests down the rod!

#tforods #fishtheoriginal

 

Backwater Basics to Catching Juvenile Tarpon On The Fly with TFO Ambassador Logan Totten

With Spring in full affect down in Southwest Florida, the temperatures are warming up, and the rain is right around the corner. This means a few things, the most important to most fly fisherman, is that juvenile and baby tarpon season is upon us. Being eager to eat flies, pull hard, fight mean and always so acrobatic – these little guys are dream fish for many anglers.

Tarpon are often seen rolling when they come up for air, which can make them fun to fish for, and it’s also a great way to locate them. Early morning in the spring in summer is of the best times to locate these rolling fish. Finding these little guys can be difficult, so here are a few tips I have picked up to be more affective while targeting small tarpon on the fly rod.

 

Location & Depth Changes

Finding the right fish for fly fishing can mean the difference in actually catching fish or just casting all morning at rolling fish. Tarpon generally like staying in deeper holes or canals where they can have safety in the depth. However, when they are eating, they will push into shallow water, edges and mangrove shorelines chasing small baitfish and minnows. This is where you will have a much higher success rate in getting one to eat your fly. Which brings us to the next tip..

Streamer Patterns, Colors, & Size

Smaller size streamer “baitfish & minnow” patterns is a must in my book. Flies like the EP micro minnow, Schminnow and Laserminnow are a few that have been proven to produce in many conditions. The smaller the better sometimes – especially when they’re keyed in on the tiny fry bait.

For colors to use, I go by the old rule of thumb — dark water, dark colors like blacks and purples; light water, light colors like whites chartreuse and natural colors. This can also be applied to the weather conditions. During the mornings/evenings and also low light days when its cloudy darker colors, you can throw a better silhouette and brighter sunny days bright colors can be less intrusive.

Gear Setup

Having the right gear is important so you can have an easy carefree day on the water. I generally like to use smaller rods that will still allow you to cast in the wind or punch larger patterns like small gurglers. The Axiom ll or Axiom II-X in 5-6 weight has been great for this job and was built for these salt conditions. Fishing in tight conditions like mangrove tunnels crazy stuff happens so its nice having a rod that is backed by its company with an unbeatable warranty.

For the reel, I use an older BVK reel, but the BVK SD reel would be a great affordable choice. Sometimes to get way back where the little guys live kayaking or wading can be your best access which often leads to reels getting submerged or wet. This makes the BVK SD ideal with its light weight frame and sealed drag.

I typically use a weight forward floating fly line, and my preferred leader setups are 16-20 lb tapered leader for the babies. For the bigger juveniles, I typically run a 16-20 lb tapered leader with a 12” 25-30 lb section.

 

Retrieval & Strip Patterns

Last but not least, for a productive day of baby tarpon fishing, getting your strip cadence down is imperative. Juvenile tarpon are aggressive fast fish and 90% of the time I like a short consistent fast strip. Even if you feel a bite, just keep stripping. They will often miss or short strike the fly so it’s crucial not to rip the bait away from the fish. There has been many times where I have had a single fish take multiple swings at a fly in the same retrieve and finally hooked him on his 4th or 5th try.

Juvenile Tarpon are an awesome fish to target on light fly rods for anybody from beginner to expert and applying a few simple principles can make your time on the water much more productive. One of my main tips for anybody is to keep it simple and have fun!

 

Words and photos provided by Logan Totten. Logan is a TFO Ambassador based out of Englewood, Florida. He also works at TFO dealer/fly shop West Wall Outfitters in Port Charlotte, and runs a guiding service on the side called Backcountry Paddle Adventures. For further questions, you can reach out to Logan at backcountrypaddleadventures@yahoo.com.