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Snook On The Fly 101, 201 & 301 – History, Tactics & More by Courtney Marie Martin

When TFO approached me recently about writing a piece on snook, I couldn’t have been more excited. This is a species I have targeted, fought for, and been passionate about my entire life. Everything about this species is absolutely fascinating to me; from their habitat, to their aggressive takes, unique spawning abilities, and their ability to survive in salt or freshwater. These fish are just as intriguing to me now, as they were more than 25 years ago, marking my first encounter with the species. If you have never had a chance to target these amazing creatures, you’ll want to add them to your list after this. However, if you have been as fortunate as myself, and had the joy of experiencing these beauties first hand, I hope you enjoy this read.

A brief back story on my roots; I’m originally from Bethune Beach, FL. If you’re not familiar with that area; It’s the southernmost point of habitable land, on a barrier island. There is no access to the mainland at this point, the rest of the island south is home to an incredible, and protected ecosystem, in the Canaveral National Seashore. The Atlantic side of the island contains one of the most righteous surf breaks on the Florida east coast, while located on the river side of the island, is the world-famous Mosquito Lagoon. Needless to say, I had a pretty well-rounded upbringing between these two bodies of water. My once small hometown changed drastically over the years, something I’m still emotional about to this day. This is a problem that is rampant in Florida, a problem that has many causes and contributing factors. With that change, eight years ago I made the decision to move to the west coast and start over on the Myakka River. This place sucked me in, I became obsessed with learning it, exploring it, and now protecting it. It became apparent within a short time, the same issues the lagoon is struggling with, they were starting to feel the effects of here as well. After 5 years of living here I left my career to focus on conservation, art, and fly fishing full-time. We’ll come back to that though, first we’re going to start this off with one of my favorite subjects; a little bit of History.

Age Before Beauty

Bare with me for a minute while I flood your brain with a little bit of Florida history.

The land we now call Florida began to form, via a combination of volcanic activity, and the deposit of marine sediments. The formation took place along northwest Africa roughly 530 million years ago. If you flash back to your middle school Geography days, you’ll remember a brief, but very important time in history, referred to as Pangea. This occurred due to Florida once being part of Gondwanaland, a super continent, that later divided into Africa and South America. Research shows that Florida then separated from Gondwanaland about 300 million years ago. The state eventually found itself wedged between Gondwanaland and North America, where they then combined, to form; Pangea. When Pangea began to separate, Florida remained behind as part of the continent of North America. Florida then began slipping slowly beneath the surface to become part of North America’s continental shelf. The landmass that is now Florida remained shallowly submerged beneath the ocean. Over time; coral, shellfish, and fish skeletons began accumulating. These mass deposits created a layer of limestone hundreds, and in some places thousands, of feet thick. As the Appalachian Mountains began to erode, sand and clay were then deposited all over Florida’s limestone layer. Much of the quartz sand covering the state today came from the rocks of that mountain chain. One of the many things that captivated me when I first came to this area, was the abundance of limestone formations I’ve located all over the river itself. Rock samples taken from the Myakka in the 1880s date the river to the Pliocene Epoch, 1.8-5.3 million years before the present, when Florida was mostly under water. However, according to University of Florida, Ocala limestone samples from the 1920s suggest that the Florida peninsula dates to the Eocene Epoch, thus dating her to be a whopping 25 to 36 million years ago. Deep grooves in these limestone formations began collecting rainfall in the form of rivers. Though there is a huge conflict in these differing data’s, I personally believe the latter of the two theories. The river and its region became home to; mastodons, mammoths, saber-toothed cats, and even megalodon. With research pointing to megs going extinct atleast 20-million years ago, it personally leads me to believe that the river is much older than some documents lead you to believe.

How Man Found the Myakka

  • 12,000 B.C. Humans from eastern Asia cross the newly, but briefly, dry Bering Strait on foot and enter North America, gathering around its deep springs for fresh water.
  • 10,200 B.C. First evidence of human habitation on the Myakka. Skeletal remains that were found, near Warm Mineral Springs, in 1959 were carbon-dated to roughly that time.
  • 1500 A.D. Florida aboriginals separate into four distinct tribes, including the Calusa tribe on the lower Gulf Coast. The Indians that called this land home believed the area to be sacred. On top of the abundant food source, they believed that storms seemed to disappear or go completely around it.
  • 1513 Juan Ponce de Leon’s search for gold treasure, combined with Florida’s legendary Fountain of Youth, led him to Charlotte Harbor and up the Peace and Myakka rivers. He is said, by many, to have found Warm Mineral Springs.
  • 1521 Ponce de Leon not only enslaved the Calusa and sold them off, but also brought an abundance of disease upon them. He ultimately died from complications caused by arrow wounds received in an altercation with the Calusa Indians. Unable to cohabitate with the Spaniards, the Calusa eventually left the area. Followed by the Spaniards departing, because they couldn’t survive without the Calusa. Over the years the surrounding land and water went through significant high water, drought, and weather events that pushed what little settlers and aboriginals were left, to the brink. Only the strong survived.

Wild and Scenic

Myakka River State Park opened for visitors in 1942. Within this now, 37,000-acre protected woodland, are hundreds of bird and animal species; Including 80 listed as endangered species. In 1985, Florida officially designated the Myakka for special protection, as the state’s first “Wild and Scenic River.” The entire river from the Upper lake, to Charlotte Harbor, is 66 miles. Nearly 8 months out of the year, especially during the winter months, the river is so shallow you can walk across it. Marshes, swamps, and sloughs also make up the 550-square mile Myakka Basin. This basin full of vast, spongy areas that hold water during the wet season, slowly releasing it to feed the river over the long months when there is no rain. This fragile body of water and ecosystem is why the Myakka needs our attention and preservation, now more than ever. Over the past 20 years, the Myakka has been laced with industrial waste, municipal sewage, agricultural runoff and untold gallons of gasoline, motor oil, and brake fluid. These pollutants come rushing across road surfaces in search of the region’s lowest point. This is all despite the passing of the Clean Water Act, in 1972. Which was placed in response to the unchecked dumping of pollution into our waterways. At the time, two-thirds of the country’s lakes, rivers and coastal waters had become unsafe for fishing or swimming. This included untreated sewage that was being dumped into open water. The most damaging additive since, ironically, has been water. An excess of water, pumped from underground wells to feed farms and mines, has saturated miles of the Myakka Basin, disturbing the river’s ancient cycle of long dry seasons and killing native vegetation. It has become an international laboratory for the study of river habitats, both how to keep them in good health and what to do when they are ailing, as rivers these days usually are. Water is traditionally low in the winter, making invasive plants and fish also a particular concern. Less water means more competition for food and oxygen. West Indian marsh grass is also crowding out native species of vegetation, eliminating food sources that the native fish are partial to. Those native fish, meanwhile, also have invasives of their own to contend with.

As you can tell, I’m extremely passionate about this place. When I was originally asked to write this article, I was sent a list of 10 talking points they’d like me to hit, so far, we’ve covered just one (insert laughter) …

Knowledge Is Power – History & Biology of Snook

Snook are thought to have originated in Central America, and due changes in the earth’s climate they migrated north to Florida. This migration goes back to a great warming trend after the Ice Age, that moved snook northward along the Mexico shoreline. They then followed the Gulf of Mexico to Cuba and Florida, splitting the state and running up along the east and west coasts. Florida proved to be the perfect environment, because snook are described as an estuarine-dependent fish species.

There are five species of snook that inhabit Florida waters; common snook, small scale fat snook, large scale fat snook, tarpon snook, and the swordspine snook.

Formerly known as excellent table fare, snook are making a huge comeback in our waters due to strict conservation efforts.

Within Florida’s diverse estuaries, juvenile snook are commonly found inhabiting; Coastal wetland ponds, island networks, and creeks. In their juvenile stages, snook show a tendency to call lower-salinity conditions home. Snook are also able to osmo-regulate, giving them the ability to adapt and thrive in both high/low salinity habitats. This is referred to as habitat plasticity, an evolutionary adaptation, expressed primarily through reversible physiological change. Which leads me to the most fascinating snook fact; Snook are a protandric hermaphroditic fish species. — Males can change to females as they age.

This transition takes place when snook are between 1-7 years of age or between 12-35 inches in length. This happens quickly, both male, and female sex cells are present in the gonads. During transition, female gonads mature directly from male gonads, after spawning. Thus, making it possible for snook, to spawn once as a male, and then again as a female within the same season.

Spawning

Spawning season typically runs the months of April-October, with peak spawn occurring during June-August. Near-shore waters containing higher salinity values is where their spawning traditionally occurs. Female snook may spawn every two days, during a new or full moon cycle, and release roughly 1.5 million eggs during each spawn. The high salinity in these locations is important to egg survival rates. Salinity provides buoyancy to the eggs carrying them to habitats more suited for survival, these eggs begin to hatch within 28hours. This phenomenon occurs on both the east and west coasts of Florida. Mouths of coastal rivers, major inlets, and the beaches of Gulf of Mexico are prime spawning locations.

Post spawn, the juvenile snook then migrate to the brackish waters of surrounding estuary environments. Once mature, they make their trek to the high salinity waters of the open ocean to join the breeding population. Snook are opportunistic ambush predators, whose feeding habits are attributed to their size and the size of their prey. Which leads us to the age-old question; “Does bigger bait equal bigger fish?”

In the snook world, the answer is, yes. As snook continue to grow they feed on larger and larger prey. Even though this behavior is rare, they even engage in cannibalism, predating upon their own. During the winter months, when adult and juvenile common snook are in close proximity to one another sharing habitat, is when this typically occurs. A feeding pattern referred to as intracohort cannibalism. Juvenile snook that find themselves in this setting may wind up becoming the largest available prey on the menu, thus proving to be nutritionally efficient to prey upon.

Come Fly with Me

Winding through the Old Florida wilderness, it’s the type of landscape that puts your vulnerability in check, a constant reminder of how small you really are in this world. The area I live in is fabled and locally labeled as snook haven, frankly, it is just that. The history, age of the land, and the species that call it home are all-encompassing pieces of knowledge to carry with you. The Myakka is a truly wild unforgiving landscape inhabited by gators, feral hogs, sharks, bobcats, bears, coyotes, panthers, venomous snakes, and large swarms of mosquitoes. When I began immersing myself into this environment, the closest thing I could compare it to would be the deepest parts of the Everglades. This is not the beach, these are not pristine sand flats, it’s not the harbor or the bay. This is as backcountry as it gets.

Do I wade fish here? Yes. Would I conscientiously recommend it to others? No.

Always research your surroundings before entering any body of water. Have a plan, triple check your gear, pay attention to your surroundings, and respect the environment. You are a guest.

Most of what we do in the backcountry is out of an aluminum jon-boat or skiff. Jon likes to even up the ante some days and throw me into a canoe. A very effective method for getting to these fish, you just have to remain extra cat-like with every movement you make.

Casting & Presentation

My number one piece of advice in the pursuit of fly fishing is; Practice, practice, practice!

Practice your cast, have a solid, confident, single and double haul going into these fish.

The techniques Jon and I both use for snook, are applicable to high or low water, and any water clarity. This is where practicing your cast is important, making that cast count no matter the conditions.

Water clarity changes daily here, some days its crystal clear, other days it can be muddy, and most days it resembles sweet tea. Some days, we encounter super low water conditions, with good water clarity. This tends to flush these fish out of their mangrove homes making sight fishing on the shore line possible. When these fish are out in the open, they can eat just as aggressively as they would in their protective structure, but they can see you just as well as you can see them.

The stealth factor and making a good cast first shot, are very important in this instance. However, one of my personal favorite fishing techniques is pitching up-under and into mangroves.

This is technical, this takes time, this takes practice. This is, however, extremely rewarding and efficient in high water, cloudy, or windy conditions. You can use a regular or weed-less flies for this technique. If you do happen to aim a little too high or snag a root, just take it easy pulling it off and it should come right out.

 

Fly Patterns & Retrieval Methods

Laser minnows, crab, shrimp, varying bait fish patterns and poppers; I’ve thrown all of these for snook and been successful. Now if you’re going to go for the gold on pitching mangroves, be ready to strip hard. The eat is usually very aggressive sometimes launching the fly airborne as if it were a top water plug. Sometimes they’ll eat as soon as it lands, others will ambush it and come out of nowhere, and then there’s the classic v-wake pushing out of the mangroves that then proceeds to finally crush the fly just inches from the boat with half your leader stripped into your rod. In that scenario I hold my breath and there’s usually a lot of praying involved; Praying the line shoots back out as pretty as it stripped through those guides.

These fish will instinctively try to run right back to where they came from, this is where you better stay alert and put the heat to them. 9 times out of 10, this is not a fish you’ll be attempting to get on the reel, most of the fight will be you gaining ground by stripping them in while keeping counter pressure on their head with the rod. The goal is to keep them out of the mangroves and get them to the boat fast. Like tarpon, snook are known for their acrobatics, be ready to fight them the same way when they go for an airborne head-shake.

Knots & Tippet

Much like a tarpon, snook’s mouths are very rough. If not hooked in the very corner of the mouth, or the top of their nose, they can ware through a leader section pretty quickly. I personally use 25-30lb fluoro as my shock tippet for these fish because of that reason. I don’t like break-offs and I really don’t like fish swimming around with gear stuck in their face. I also prefer a simple loop knot for connecting my fly to the tippet, this provides life like action during the retrieve. I’ve seen snook delicately mouth at flies and I’ve watched them smash flies. Every fish is different, retrieval techniques can vary by the fish. I’ve had fish out run my steady “strip, strip, strip” retrieve and end up on top of the fly, completely missing it. I’ve had fish follow-follow-follow, and then all of a sudden turn off, only for the next fish to inhale it. And then I’ve had encounters sight casting where I cast, I give it a couple pops trying to get their attention, they slowly come over, and I was just a millisecond too slow on beginning to work the fly. This results in a fish completely spooking and blowing out due to being able to get too good of a glance at your fly. It can be a delicate dance sometimes with these fish, but they will always keep you wanting more.

 

Don’t Get Discouraged!

“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” Persistence pays off with these fish, if you happen to totally miff the hook set, pick up your line and fire a cast right back up to the same spot. This technique is extremely effective, this is also why a fast and accurate single haul, is just as important as a clean double haul. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve hooked a fish on the second or third try, just from goofing up the initial hook set. I actually had this happen last week, I was on the bow and had a solid follow out of the mangroves. The fish charged it, ended up being on top of my fly, and completely missed it. I fired a cast right back up to the big boil he left, he ate it again on the second strip, right in the middle of the pause. Resulting in a totally goofed hookset and Jon staring at me from the poling platform like, “Really…??” Stubborn I am, I fired up a third cast, this time Jon speaks up and says, “why would you do that?? That fish isn’t going to eat again, you need to be casting ahead.” As fate would have it, whammy! That fish ate it a third time, this time charging the boat, running under it, and breaking me off. This event lasted all of two seconds, but what a cool fish! We were all high-fives and laughs after that fish.

Fly Lines

Another important tool in your box – selecting the right fly line. Of the many innovations that Lee Wulff has contributed to fly fishing, the Bermuda Triangle Taper fly line is my go-to fly line for anything saltwater. I line all of my saltwater setups with the next weight size up. Which brings us to setups..

 

Fly Rods

A typical saltwater fishing day, 7/8/9wt rods are my go-to. My favorite setup to toss on a daily basis is an 8wt BVK or an 8/9wt Mangrove, 7wt class would also my Mangrove, and then there’s the 8 and 9wt Axiom II and Axiom II-X. These setups are laser focused and perfect for the saltwater pursuit of any species, especially snook!

But don’t forget that 10wt! This is an important tool, that will lead to regret if left behind. Your 38″+ upper class of snook will need A LOT of heat to keep them from running to structure. There are snook that Jon and I have both come across, where we just look back at each other and can’t believe what we’re seeing. I highly recommend a 10wt for those fish, with a large bait pattern, and a heavier tippet class.

The coolest thing about really big snook, they do not spook easily. They know exactly how big they are and their opportunistic feeding patterns revolve around that. If you can get it in front of them, they will most likely inhale it, but you have to bring the right tools to the fight! These fish are smart, they know their territory well, and will run to any structure they can to break you off quickly.

If by chance you are looking to wade fish, I don’t recommend that here. My best advice is to follow their patterns. If you scroll back up to the Knowledge Is Power section, hidden in there is everything you need to know about finding beach snook.

“A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture, is like a tree without roots.” -M.Garvey

Words and photos by TFO Ambassador Courtney Marie Martin. Sunset snook photo (Photo #2) taken by Eric Shaeffer.

Courtney is based out of Charlotte Harbor, Florida.  When not fishing for snook, tarpon and redfish with her partner Jon Lee (TFO Pro Staff) and spending time with her family, Courtney is a fantastic artist, where a lot of her art is inspired by her time on the water. You can find out more about Courtney here.

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Introducing Fly Fishing To Your Significant Other | 5 Tips From Chris Thompson

To many, flyfishing is a solitary pursuit. Long moments on a river spent with their own thoughts are broken by brief periods of communal meals, laughter, and lies. A buddy can be 50 yards downstream, just close enough to hear gleeful shouts at a good hook up, or shouted curses as one breaks off, yet not close enough to disturb the serene, babbling water that washes the rest of the world away. I have never been one of those people. I find the best moments in life are those shared with the ones we care for the most, and fishing is no different. I enjoy sharing the process with my friends, or fishing buddies.

Mind you, those friends must go through a rigorous screening process. Everyone can’t be allowed into that sacred space. Plenty of friends are great to share a finger of rum with, talk about the family, or even share deep thoughts and dreams. On the water with a fly rod is another matter entirely. That’s church. There, the wrong person can transform a small slice of paradise into just another bland place in this world. The right person brings an explosion of color into even the dullest day. They are few and far between.

I have several fishing buddies that have been part of my life for a very long time. One of them stands above the rest, and I made sure I married her. Who better to pass those selection criteria than the person you decide to be your partner in life? I know, a lot of you are already laughing (or shouting…or worse) and think I’m crazy. I admit, my marriage isn’t normal. Kellie was a guide when she was younger on the Little Red. She’d mastered trout fishing, landed salmon, and fought smallies before she’d ever met me. Sure, that made my screening a lot easier. She already shared my appetite for fly fishing. She also shared my passion for life, and we unquestionably share passion for one another.

Passion. Isn’t that what angling truly is? Isn’t that what we all really want in our partner? Your significant other may not understand fishing, but would probably like to know why you’re obsessed. Try letting them in. Invite them along, and like you, they may just discover the beautiful places our fish live, the skill required to hook and land them, our connection to nature as we try, and the healing the water provides. If you’re still reading, then you likely haven’t thrown your hands up at the thought of being on the water with your spouse (or girl/boyfriend). However, you’re probably unluckier than me and didn’t marry an angler. At this point, you’re receptive to the thought of inviting that special someone into your magical place, but just don’t know where to start. Kellie and I have been asked how we manage it before, and I have a few suggestions.

TIP #1: EASE INTO IT

You’re already in love with our sport. That means you’ve already accepted some things your loved one will have to ease into. That first trip can’t be ice in the guides, numb feet, Erie steelhead fishing. Fighting off mosquitos and No See Ums at sunset on your local pond may not be the best initiation either. Sure, I get it. The fish are rising, but trust me, this isn’t the way. Instead, choose a serene and beautiful location you know is likely to produce a few fish. Keep the trip at a few hours to a half day trip. Let your partner be introduced to the best of what we do. If they like it, then they’ll see the other stuff soon enough!

TIP #2: THIS IS NOT A NORMAL DAY

Waking up at 3:30am, fumbling through making a pot of coffee while half asleep, stumbling to the truck, and then stopping for a gas station gut buster and the day’s provision of Slim Jims might be the norm…for you. You’re anxious, excited, and hopeful about what the day might bring. No kid has ever been more excited on Christmas morning. However, throwing the non-initiated into the pre-dawn ritual isn’t going to work out well for either of you. Plan a day that includes time to get ready, some comfort items, no rushing, and remember you’re trying to show someone else a good time. I’m sure you’re in tune with what that will take, and if not, you now have the chance to learn.

TIP #3: IT’S NOT ABOUT YOU

This may be the most important thing to remember. Today’s trip, or maybe even the next dozen, aren’t about you. They’re about her (or him), and ultimately the two of you together. If you’re hoping this will be the start of a genuine lifetime fishing partner situation, then you have to be the guide. I’m not just talking about being the fishing guide. You are the trip planner, the logistician, the tour director, and the guide on the water. You’re hoping your most special someone may just change their life to join you on a regular basis. Show them a good time! Help them rig. Coach them through their time on the water. Have a shore lunch. Be the net guy. Take a break when they get tired, and end the day when they’re ready. Then go relive the experience over some drinks and great food.

TIP#4: PATIENCE AND HUMILITY

Some of you have been waving a long rod around for decades. Your partner is just starting. They may never be at your level, nor do they need to be. Sooner or later they’ll reach a level of competency allowing you to graduate from Ghillie, but until then your role is as much mentor as fishing buddy. You’ll need to teach knots, rigging, fly selection, tactics, and everything under the sun. Sharing your knowledge can be a reward in and of itself. You’ll also need to know when you just don’t have the aptitude or capability to be helpful. For example, soon your partner will begin their voyage casting, and you my friend are not a suitable captain. Lefty Kreh frequently said he could teach anyone to cast except his wife. Unless you’d like to forego some fishing trips for couples counseling, you’d do well to heed his advice. Hire a casting instructor, or ask a friend, but unless you are among the rarest of breeds, admit you’re not equipped for this task.

TIP #5: HAVE THE RIGHT GEAR 

Everything about this process can be exciting and fulfilling, but this part is just plain fun! Along this journey you get to help outfit your partner. In the beginning, they’ll need their own rod. Sure one of your spares may do the trick, but it’s always nice to have something of your own. You don’t have to go overboard. I find the TFO Bug Launcher in 4/5 or 5/6 are exceptional trout and panfish rods, and their finish and smaller handles are especially appealing to ladies. The NXT Black Label is also a great entry level rod that has a smooth action, and is available in 5 or 8 weights. Both rod series are affordable, available in full outfits, are sure to provide years of use, and are backed by a lifetime warranty. As your partner develops a feel for what they like you get an instant gift list, and actually are required to visit fly shops. You’ll want waders, chest packs, stripping baskets, rods, reels…and maybe a second mortgage!

From Michigan, to the Carolina Coast, to Alaska, and many points between, I’ve shared my love of flyfishing with the love of my life. I introduced Kellie to saltwater flyfishing, and she’s shared her expertise on trout streams. We’ve fished in waders, on kayaks, and from boats. We’ve laughed. We’ve cried. We’ve cursed like sailors. What we don’t have are arguments about going fishing, because it’s an integral part of our marriage. It’s part of who we are. It can also be part of who you are. You may have to chart a different course, but after all, “Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.”

All the best.

Words and Photos by Chris Thompson. Chris is a TFO Ambassador based out of coastal North Carolina. He is a former veteran of the USMC who does a lot of work with the non-profit organization Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., and spends more time helping veterans get introduced (and obsessed) with fly fishing.

Backwater Basics to Catching Juvenile Tarpon On The Fly with TFO Ambassador Logan Totten

With Spring in full affect down in Southwest Florida, the temperatures are warming up, and the rain is right around the corner. This means a few things, the most important to most fly fisherman, is that juvenile and baby tarpon season is upon us. Being eager to eat flies, pull hard, fight mean and always so acrobatic – these little guys are dream fish for many anglers.

Tarpon are often seen rolling when they come up for air, which can make them fun to fish for, and it’s also a great way to locate them. Early morning in the spring in summer is of the best times to locate these rolling fish. Finding these little guys can be difficult, so here are a few tips I have picked up to be more affective while targeting small tarpon on the fly rod.

 

Location & Depth Changes

Finding the right fish for fly fishing can mean the difference in actually catching fish or just casting all morning at rolling fish. Tarpon generally like staying in deeper holes or canals where they can have safety in the depth. However, when they are eating, they will push into shallow water, edges and mangrove shorelines chasing small baitfish and minnows. This is where you will have a much higher success rate in getting one to eat your fly. Which brings us to the next tip..

Streamer Patterns, Colors, & Size

Smaller size streamer “baitfish & minnow” patterns is a must in my book. Flies like the EP micro minnow, Schminnow and Laserminnow are a few that have been proven to produce in many conditions. The smaller the better sometimes – especially when they’re keyed in on the tiny fry bait.

For colors to use, I go by the old rule of thumb — dark water, dark colors like blacks and purples; light water, light colors like whites chartreuse and natural colors. This can also be applied to the weather conditions. During the mornings/evenings and also low light days when its cloudy darker colors, you can throw a better silhouette and brighter sunny days bright colors can be less intrusive.

Gear Setup

Having the right gear is important so you can have an easy carefree day on the water. I generally like to use smaller rods that will still allow you to cast in the wind or punch larger patterns like small gurglers. The Axiom ll or Axiom II-X in 5-6 weight has been great for this job and was built for these salt conditions. Fishing in tight conditions like mangrove tunnels crazy stuff happens so its nice having a rod that is backed by its company with an unbeatable warranty.

For the reel, I use an older BVK reel, but the BVK SD reel would be a great affordable choice. Sometimes to get way back where the little guys live kayaking or wading can be your best access which often leads to reels getting submerged or wet. This makes the BVK SD ideal with its light weight frame and sealed drag.

I typically use a weight forward floating fly line, and my preferred leader setups are 16-20 lb tapered leader for the babies. For the bigger juveniles, I typically run a 16-20 lb tapered leader with a 12” 25-30 lb section.

 

Retrieval & Strip Patterns

Last but not least, for a productive day of baby tarpon fishing, getting your strip cadence down is imperative. Juvenile tarpon are aggressive fast fish and 90% of the time I like a short consistent fast strip. Even if you feel a bite, just keep stripping. They will often miss or short strike the fly so it’s crucial not to rip the bait away from the fish. There has been many times where I have had a single fish take multiple swings at a fly in the same retrieve and finally hooked him on his 4th or 5th try.

Juvenile Tarpon are an awesome fish to target on light fly rods for anybody from beginner to expert and applying a few simple principles can make your time on the water much more productive. One of my main tips for anybody is to keep it simple and have fun!

 

Words and photos provided by Logan Totten. Logan is a TFO Ambassador based out of Englewood, Florida. He also works at TFO dealer/fly shop West Wall Outfitters in Port Charlotte, and runs a guiding service on the side called Backcountry Paddle Adventures. For further questions, you can reach out to Logan at backcountrypaddleadventures@yahoo.com.

 

COVID-19 Update

May 4, 2020 – UPDATE!

We’re happy to update our anglers with the news that our headquarters is now open and operating at full capacity! Dealer orders are being processed, web orders are being fulfilled and warranties are being repaired. All angler orders are being shipped in as timely a manner as possible.

We’re doing our part to stop the spread of COVID-19 by adhering to the safety procedures outlined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you need to visit our office in person, we have social distancing and sanitizing procedures in place and are happy to serve you!

Sincerely,

TFO

 

March 23, 2020

In light of ongoing global health concerns, we want to let you know that your well-being, and the well-being of our team members, is our number one priority.

We are carefully following all appropriate safety procedures as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And we are ensuring our team members are safe so that they can continue to take care of our anglers.

TFO is located in the County of Dallas, Texas, which has ordered all businesses to cease activities at facilities located within the county effective March 23rd at 11:59PM. This means that we will have limited operations until further notice to help do our part to stem the spread of COVID-19 and protect the safety of our team members. Our customer service will remain open and we will continue to do our best to support our dealer and anglers promptly. Our fulfillment department will operate in compliance with the County of Dallas order and we will keep our customers notified of any changes to the situation. Please check our website and social media outlets for further updates. We hope you and your loved ones are safe and healthy.

We look forward to continuing to provide you great fishing tools to better enjoy the outdoors.

Sincerely,

TFO

Customer Service: As mentioned above, we have had to reduce our phone coverage hours to comply with County of Dallas requirements and to maintain the safety of our customer service team. We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause. During this time please email us at info@tforods.com for the fastest response.


Update On Warranty Repairs

Please note that the impact of COVID-19 has caused us to have limited operations at our warehouse in Dallas. While our customer service and warranty repairs will remain active, we are working with limited staff, and there might a longer than normal return time for repairs.

To insure the location of your shipment, please be sure to grab your tracking information from the carrier you use for your records.

 

Generation To Generation

My parents belonged to the greatest generation, although no one ever told them until late in their lives. I’m pretty sure they didn’t realize it when they were my age and definitely not at my kids age. They never realized how great they were; they simply returned from the war, got married, got jobs and raised families. Since then, we’ve had baby boomers, Generations X, Y and Z, millennials and probably several others along the way.

One thing has remained constant across the generations, however, at least in my family; each generation invests in the next, not necessarily in a material sense but by passing down wisdom, values and passions. My love of the outdoors was learned from my dad, which I in turn, have passed down to my children and their spouses. I learned to fish standing by my father’s side. At first he tied the knots and baited the looks, but soon taught me to do it myself. I not only learned to fish, but also to appreciate the beauty of God’s creation. I gained respect for the fish I caught and other animals I hunted. My dad was my role model, hero as well as mentor.

I learned fly fishing as an adult, partially from my father but also from other mentors. With a sport as complex as fly fishing, mentorship serves a vital role to a fledgling angler. Some of my fly fishing mentors are well known like Lefty Kreh and Ed Jaworowski, but many others are less famous but still just as important. Each planted the seeds or nurtured my growth, helping me to develop as an angler and man. I honor my father and all my other mentors when I share with others what was taught to me.

Now my kids are sharing this passion and wisdom with their children. In our family, this begins at an early age. On a recent family trip to the Driftless Streams in Northeast Iowa, we introduced my grandson, Gage and granddaughter Emma to fly fishing. My wife, Jo took photos of Gage on Evan’s back as he fished. Michelle made sure he was warm and snug. Clay carried Emma in a chest pack.

Even though Gage and Emma were far too young to fish or even walk along the stream banks, we enjoyed the outdoors as a family, laughed a lot and even caught some pretty nice fish. But I stood back at one point and simply took it all in, admittedly a little choked up on that beautiful morning. I sensed the warmth of my dad’s smile. He would have been delighted. And Lefty too; as my daughter Erin held the rod and I place my hand over hers, Lefty’s hand was there too, guiding us through the casting stroke.

Written by TFO National Advisor Jason Randall

*All Photos Provided By Jo Randall*

Another Tribute to Lefty

Lefty Kreh passed away nearly two years ago, but memories of fly-fishing’s biggest ambassador endure. The American Museum of Fly Fishing has paid tribute to the long-time TFO advisor with a film — Time — which is expected to be released in a few months.

TFO chatted with Alex Ford of the Museum to discuss the project, which got significant contributions from TFO advisors Flip Pallot, Blane Chocklett and Bob Clouser. All were good friends with Lefty.

Below are excerpts of the interview.

TFO: What was your role in the film? Were you the editor, the producer? Did you come up with the idea. …?

AF: “We knew we wanted to do a film this year. I spent a lot of time looking for a great story that would not only highlight the legacy of fly fishing, but also involve the museum and its collection in Manchester, Vermont. … I remember reading a Fly Fisherman Magazine article that Flip wrote about driving up to Maryland to fish smallmouth streams with Lefty. That was the original idea and then we got the FlyLords crew involved. Then we talked to Flip, and Blane came on board as well. …”

TFO: When will the film be out? For people to see?

AF: “If we can get it in the F3T (the Fly Fishing Film Tour), that would be ideal. It will be finished by October 1st. That’s the deadline for that. Hopefully by early September, we will be ready to go.”

TFO: I know you’re in the editing process right now. How long is the film? Fifteen minutes? 20 minutes? An hour?

AF: “The film will be 10 minutes. Then there will be lots of clips around it. We did interviews with Blane, Flip and Bob Clouser. All were an hour each. We’re going to cut some of that into the main film, but of course we’re going to use that for other stuff as well.”

TFO: I know you’re not finished, but how long did it take to do the project?

AF: “From conception to finish, about a year. A lot of that was coordination and fundraising in the beginning. We shot the actual project in early June. It should be done around mid-September.”

TFO: I know you can’t give anything away in terms of content, but can you give us an idea of the narrative of the film, what people can expect?

AF: “It follows the relationship between Flip and Lefty, how unique that was and also Lefty’s influence on a personal level. Blane for instance ties a Game Changer (fly) on Lefty’s old vise and he fishes with some of his old Deceivers (from the Museum), things like that.”

TFO: Anything that you learned about Lefty that you didn’t know before? Everyone, I know, has a perception of him. It seems like everyone has a story about him. … Is there anything interesting about him that you learned from this project?

AF: “Generally how supportive he was of other people. On a more specific level, there’s a strain of anthrax named after him. He worked in a factory for a number of years. There were three guys who contracted anthrax. The way it manifested itself in him was never seen before. It’s rather unique.”

TFO: When there’s a project, there’s things that make it worthwhile. Anything with this film that made it particularly worthwhile?

AF: “With Bob Clouser, we didn’t know he’d be (near where we made the film), but he happened be staying a few minutes from Flip’s house. For me, it was so cool to be at Flip’s house. Here’s Bob Clouser and Blane Chocklett and we’re talking about Lefty Kreh and Flip as well. That was just amazing, seeing all these heroes in the sport all together to commemorate Lefty who’s a hero to them. It was humbling all around.”

TFO: How much did Flip and Blane help you out? What was their role in all of this?

AF: “They were both great. Blane had a story about the Gummy Minnow and how Lefty got him his first fly deal. They were both excited that the Museum was doing a project like this. They could not have been more accommodating. The first day of filming was intense. We went on for 12 hours. Everyone did what they needed to do to get it done. Then there was Flip with his professionalism in front of the camera. It was amazing. It was like watching an episode of Walker’s Cay Chronicles being made.”

TFO: Anything else you would like to add?

AF: “Lefty’s family donated a lot of his materials, a lot of his estate, to the museum. We have his tying desk. His flies. All sorts of books, DVDs. A lot of cool stuff.”

TFO: What’s the name of the film?

AF: “Right now we’re calling it Time. That came from Flip who said, ‘All I have is time.’ We didn’t plan that one out, but it resonated.’’

 

Comments, questions about the film on Lefty? Feel free to visit one of TFO’s social media pages.

How to Beat the Summer Heat and Catch Fish

As the first stretch of August approaches, it’s time to enjoy the last bit of summer. And if there’s a sliver of free time between time with family and friends, fishing is a great way to relax.
Below are a few summer options to help maximize success, regardless of whether you prefer spinning gear or a fly rod.
Find a Tailwater
Summer brings heat. Fish as a rule, trout, in particular, struggle with higher water temperatures. Tailwater rivers pull cooler water from the bottom of a lake. Fish like consistent water temperature, and the insect hatches tend to be more prolific. The result is big fish that like to eat year-round.
Warmer water temperatures are not as big of a factor in the West, but that’s not the case in the Southeast and East, where anglers are always searching for cooler water. Top tailwaters to try include the Watauga and South Holston in Tennessee, the Nantahala in North Carolina, the Jackson in Virginia. Outside the southeast, there’s the Bighorn in Montana, the Green in Utah, the White in Arkansas, the Farmington in Connecticut and the Arkansas in Colorado.
A good setup for bigger water is TFO’s Axiom II-X paired with a BVK SD reel. Both of these items are set to be be available in October, along with a few of our other new products. A more current big-water option is the Axiom II.
 Try Lake Fishing
River and creek fishing offer more of a definitive roadmap to find fish, assuming you can identify the current seams and structure. Lakes and ponds can be intimidating to the newcomer and therefore are often overlooked. The good thing about stillwater fishing is you can find summer fish, if you learn how to fish cooler, deeper water, which is, in general, where the fish will be holding. Try drop shotting or the countdown method to increase your odds of a quality catch.
Top TFO spin rods to try are the Tactical Bass and Tactical Elite Bass. Both are expected to be available in October. Another good option is our Pacemaker series, designed by TFO advisor and pro tournament angler Cliff Pace.
If you prefer a less technical strategy, target panfish with TFO’s Trout-Panfish rod. They’re perfect for kids and can be caught on spin or fly much of the summer.
Head for the Brine
Freshwater fishing, though doable in the summer, can be tough once July’s swelter arrives. Plan your weekend trip or vacation to your nearest southern coast. Snook, redfish and tarpon, to name a few, are warmwater species. Time the tides right and opportunities abound. The biggest obstacle with saltwater angling is finding the fish. There’s a lot of water, and the fish hold in a mere fraction of it. The best thing you can is do in this instance is hire a guide. Guides have the benefit of local knowledge and will significantly shorten your learning curve on new water.
Get Out of Your Comfort Zone
Many of us are creatures of habit. We fish a certain way when the conditions suit us. Rarely do the stars consistently align with that regimentation. This where it pays to learn a new skill. If you fly fish, pick up a spinning rod. If you spin fish, try to fling a fly. If you’re a dry-fly fisherman, maybe throw a streamer or two for deeper fish. If you love streamers, toss an afternoon grasshopper along the bank. If you like shallow-running crankbaits, try fishing a Carolina rig with a purple worm to get closer to the bottom.
Summer, without question, provides its share of challenges, but there are ample opportunities for the aspiring angler. Try one of the above approaches and let us know how your fared on one of our social media pages.

TFO Unveils New Products

ICAST is over. We at TFO are back home from the trip to Orlando, but if you missed the world’s largest sportfishing show, do not despair.

We introduced quite a few new items at ICAST this year. On the fly side, we welcomed the Axiom II-X fly rod, the NXT Black Label Kit, and the BVK SD. As for spinning gear, we have the Tactical Bass Elite and Tactical Bass series as well as the Professional Walleye series.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a serious fly fisherman or an angler who prefers traditional spinning gear, TFO offers quality options for everyone —- from new anglers just getting started to seasoned professionals.

Here’s a bit more detail about each item, all of which will become available to consumers in the coming months:

The Axiom II-X: The Axiom impressed. Then came the Axiom II, which drew rave reviews. The Axiom II-X has a tough act to follow, but if you want a rod that will deliver a big-time cast without sacrificing accuracy, this satin-blue stick is for you. Retails for ($349.95-$369.95) in weights 5-12. For more info, check out the video below.

The BVK SD: Need a reel to go with your new Axiom II-X? There’s no better choice than the BVK SD. Those who have the BVK swear by it. But get this: The BVK SD offers everything its predecessor did —- with a sealed drag system —- for the same price. Maintenance is minimal, so there’s no more worrying about the interior components. Now they’re fully protected. The BVK SD runs from $199.95-$229.95 and comes in four sizes I, II, III and III+.

NXT Black Label Kit: Fly fishing doesn’t have to be expensive, nor doesn’t it have to be complicated. In essence, that’s the premise behind the NXT Black Label Kit. You get a rod, reel, backing and fly line, all for a very reasonable price ($219.95-$229.95). Since the rod and reel and line are pre-matched, you don’t have to worry about pairing those components, a process that can be intimidating for inexperienced anglers.

Tactical Bass Rods: So you’re a serious bass fisherman. Like to fish topwater? How about crankbaits? Maybe finesse is more your style? If so, our Tactical Bass series ($149.95-$169.95) is for you, no matter how precise your style of angling is.

Tactical Elite Bass Rods:  Whatever profession you choose, you need tools of the trade that will get the job done day after day. So it is with pro anglers and our Tactical Elite series. If you want to make a living fishing, serious tournament fishermen need a rod that will preform consistently day in and day out. By all accounts, our Tactical Elite series ($199.95) more than holds its own.

Professional Walleye Series: One of the biggest challenges in catching walleye is feeling the bite, but our newest walleye series provides enough sensitivity, from the handle to the tip, to help anglers counter this issue. And there’s the added bonus of versatility:  You can jig, rig, crank and troll with this rod ($99.95).

Comments on our new products? Check out one of our social media pages.

TFO Introduces the Axiom II-X Fly Rod

The Axiom II-X was designed for the intermediate to advanced fly angler seeking to maximize accuracy at distance.

Based on the fast action of our renowned TiCrX, we used our highest modulus material and Axiom technology to redefine performance in an extremely powerful fly rod. Unlike other “stiff” rods, the Axiom II-X delivers both the energy necessary for long casts and the incredible tracking and recovery which results in accuracy at distance. If it comes down to one cast, one perfect long cast, this is the fishing tool to do the job.

TFO’s patented and exclusive Axiom technology embeds a double-helix of Kevlar within the blank. The superior tensile strength of the Kevlar acts to buttress the rod’s carbon fiber matrix in compression. The result is that Axiom series fly rods stabilize faster and smoother, absorb shock better and comfortably tolerate over-loading. The angler benefits because Axiom technology virtually eliminates the ability to over power the rod when casting. Bottom line – whether you carry more line in the air or push the rod to the limit, you won’t feel any mushiness – What you will feel is line ripping out of your hand as it launches.

The Axiom II-X series is constructed with high modulus carbon fiber material and an embedded double-helix of Kevlar within the blank all finished in a satin sky blue. The series features premium quality cork handles with burl accents, anodized aluminum up-locking reel seats with carbon fiber inserts. All eight models feature alignment dots color coded by line weight, Recoil guides by REC and ultra-lightweight chromium-impregnated stainless-steel snake guides. All Axiom II-X rods are packaged in a labeled rod sock and rod tube.

Axiom II-X rods are available in 9’ 4-piece configurations from 5 to 12-weight and retail from $349.95-$369.95.

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO): TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, lakes and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork. For more information, please visit: www.tforods.com

Temple Fork Outfitters
Dallas, TX 75247

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters
instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters
twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.

TFO Introduces the NXT Black Label Kit

The NXT Black Label series Kits were designed to make fly fishing simple and affordable – TFO’s mission.

Because TFO’s NXT series kit are the gold standard for fly fishing schools and educational programs across the United States, we consider them the most important product we make. Whether as a great gift for the aspiring fly angler or a superb backup for the fisherman who has everything, the NXT Black Label quite simply offers the highest performance to price ratio of any fly fishing outfit available and it’s covered by TFO’s famous no-fault lifetime warranty.

These high-performance fly fishing kits flatten the learning curve by making it easier and more rewarding to become an active participant in this sport of a lifetime. The foundation of the NXT Black Label is the TFO Pro II medium-fast blank which offers plenty of forgiveness for delicate presentations and cushioning light leaders but loads easily for longer casts into the wind. The rods are a handsome, matte black with half wells (5-weight) and full wells (8-weight) grips made from reconstituted cork for extreme durability. Aluminum oxide stripping guides, chromium-impregnated stainless-steel snake guides and an anodized aluminum up- locking reel seat make the NXT Black Label kits great for chasing fish in fresh or saltwater. NXT Black Label kits include a matching cast aluminum NXT BLK II (5-weight) or III (8-weight) size reel with and a stainless-steel alternating disc drag system. The reel comes loaded with 20-pound Dacron backing, a premium weight forward floating line with welded front loop and looped leader. The 80-foot fly line is up-lined one line size to insure the angler quickly feel the rod load and can quickly deliver a fly. NXT Black Label kits come packaged in a cordura rod and reel travel case ready for a fly and fishing. The NXT Black Label kits remain true to TFO’s commitment to products offering anglers inspired performance versus price. The NXT Black Label Kits series retail from $219.95-$229.95.

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO): TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, lakes and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork. For more information, please visit: www.tforods.com

Temple Fork Outfitters
Dallas, TX 75247

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters
instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters
twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.