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Three Basic Casts with Ed Jaworowski

Once you can manage a reasonable forward cast, often called a “pick up and lay down”, you should focus on expanding your repertoire of casts. Due to limited space, I can only describe the basic mechanics of three, but these will hopefully get you started.

ROLL CAST

The roll cast is perhaps the most misunderstood. Fishermen regularly complain that, “My roll cast is terrible; the line splashes down or piles up.” Invariably, traditional instruction is at the root of this problem. We have all heard instructions like “start with the rod at 11:00”, “let the line drape behind you”, “chop down as if using a cleaver or hatchet”, and so on. Such instructions might suffice for casting small flies short distances with a floating line, but to get greater distance, turn over large or heavy flies, or fish sinking lines, they compel us to use excessive force or effort. The reasons are obvious.

First, starting with the line hanging limp behind you represents slack, and you have to get rid of that slack before you can load the rod. Lightly toss the “D-loop” behind you, but start forward before it collapses to the surface. You only need a short piece of line (the “anchor”) actually on the surface when you begin the stroke, so have the end of the line no farther in front of you than approximately a rod length or so when you start forward. Finally, since the line must continue traveling in the direction the tip Is moving (not where it is pointing) when the rod straightens, stroke forward, not downward. You want the line to unroll in the air above the water rather than roll across the surface, except in one special case. This may call for starting with the rod tip well to the rear, even pointing straight back for very long casts. This allows you to make a longer stroke, and will load the rod more deeply into the butt with no extra effort.

Lefty Kreh demonstrates why chopping down on the roll cast is poor advice. Most of the energy goes downward, instead of forward; the loop is very large, wastes a lot of energy, and will pile up at the end unless you use excessive force. Photo: Ed Jaworowski
Note this exceptionally efficient and tight loop as it unrolls toward the target. The keys are: starting with the rod pointed well to the rear; stroking the rod forward, not downward; very fast but smooth final acceleration to an instant stop. Photo: Ed Jaworowski

CURVE CASTS

Aside from a straight forward cast and a roll cast, curve casts have more applications in many fishing situations than any other. Understand that what the hand does at the end of the stroke, the rod tip will duplicate; the line and fly will in turn replicate that. So, if you want the line to curve, you must make the tip curve as the rod straightens. These photos and explanations demonstrate just two of several ways to make this happen, whether casting sidearm or overhead. In either case, avoid stroking downward toward the water.

Here, I cast sidearm, applying a little more effort than the cast would normally call for. The excess energy causes the line to curve to my left, around the tree stump. Casting left-handed, which is quite simple, will allow the line to curve from the opposite side. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

Making the line curve with an overhead cast, when conditions call for that, is a bit trickier, but if you sharply turn your knuckles to the right or left the instant before stopping, the rod tip and, ultimately, the line and fly will do the same.

In this example, I sharply turned my hand to the right at the very end of the stroke. The line unrolled straight ahead between the trees, then the leader and popper sharply snapped to the right, behind the tree. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

REACH CAST

While a curve cast calls for modification during the actual execution of the casting stroke, the reach cast introduces an additional motion after your hand stops and the rod straightens. There are a number of applications for this cast. One example, say you want to cast a dry fly directly upstream beyond a trout, but must avoid having the line fall over the fish and spook it. If conditions won’t allow you to move to a better position, a reach cast can solve your problem.

Stop the rod tip going directly toward the target but, while the line is unrolling in the air, continually and steadily swing the rod off to the right or left. It is crucial however, that you keep feeding line with your line hand while making the reach maneuver. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

 

When executed properly, the fly will go directly to the target, but the line will fall to the water well to the side. The rod will be pointing at 90 degrees to the direction of the cast, as if you had cast from a position 9 or 10 feet to the right or left. Photo: The Complete Cast (TFO)

TACKLE

While skill is more important than tackle when casting, better designed tools will help greatly. Of course, personal choices come into play; here are mine. For heavier warm- and saltwater fishing, calling say for 8 to 12-weights, my decided favorite is the Axiom 2-X. Due to its higher modulus and Kevlar double-helix, it tracks, unloads, and stabilizes more efficiently, with less vibration, than any rod I have ever cast. Period. This makes for easier longer casts, as well as those described above, especially with larger and heavier flies, and with minimal false casting. For lighter (i.e., 3 to 7-weight) fishing, I rely on the quick, light, and durable LK Legacy. It’s ideally suited for all anglers when situations call for accurate and delicate presentations.

For much more detailed explanations of these and many other casts, I suggest you consult The Complete Cast, the four-hour instructional DVD/Blu-Ray from TFO, on which Lefty Kreh and I collaborated, and my newly-released Perfecting the Cast (Stackpole Books), which summarizes what I learned from my 45 years of coaching.

Tools of the Trade – The Axiom ll Fly Rod

It’s hard to believe it’s been almost four years since the Axiom ll fly rod was released. With the collaboration of pretty much the entire rod design team at TFO, we were able to revisit the original Axiom (2007).

What we came up with was a lighter, more responsive rod that would eventually set the foundation for the popular Axiom ll-X. While the Axiom ll-X, (released in 2019) has received great feedback for being an excellent fast action fish fighting tool, the moderate-action taper of the Axiom ll can be applied to many freshwater and saltwater applications. There is a clear reason why it is a favorite amongst TFO staff, ambassadors, and anglers.

Whether you’re looking for a streamer rod or looking for an upgrade to target both larger freshwater and saltwater species, the Axiom ll is not to be overlooked. Here is more about the Axiom ll from TFO’s Fly Fishing Category Manager Nick Conklin.

Photo: Oliver Sutro

The Axiom-II fly rod fits in a specific and critical spot in the TFO line-up for those looking for feel and power.

What the Axiom II offers is something needed by every fly angler – a rod that anglers of many casting styles can pick up, and effectively load and un-load within minutes. It is why our product copy calls it a tool that is “engineered to fit the angler, (not the other way around).” But what is the other way around?

We found after years of designing and producing fly rods, a startling trend had emerged. Rod design emphasis started to focus on space age materials, fibers and materials resulting in ultra-fast and stiff rods. What was meant as tools for anglers of different casting styles and skills, the new focus was to compete against other brands and garner a high return on search engines. The needs of anglers started to fall by the wayside.

What TFO aimed to develop with the Axiom II was a tool that is more of a medium-fast action, with mid-level stiffness.

Photo: Colin Arisman

Breaking It Down: The Design Emphasis of the Axiom ll

The top sections were designed specifically for easy loading, with increased sensitivity, while also incorporating a butt section stiff enough to fight fish and maintain a load when casting larger flies and heavy lines. The Axiom II is not necessarily a rod for beginners, but rather an “in-between,” tool that could handle more advanced angling and casting scenarios.

We learned from our original Axiom rod series, that some people liked the cannon, “broomstick,” style rod, but many did not. Those same people found they had to put too much work into loading the rod and were not being effective anglers. Solutions such as overlining the rod, or applying too much on the forward cast, creating too many problems and many times bad loops.

What we felt some anglers needed was a mix between power and feel. A tool with the guts to cast the big stuff, but enough soul in the blank to provide an angler with instant feedback while casting.

The “feedback,” portion of this is critical, which mean being able to feel the load, while the rod adapts to the caster. Whether you have a faster, powerful casting stroke or a more deliberate, timed casting motion, the Axiom II will be an effective line moving tool.

Michigan guide and TFO sales rep Brian Kozminski reflects, “I love the Axiom ll because it allows for better roll casting. Short distance delivery of the fly is crucial in smaller rivers. The only time I need to launch 60+ feet of line is in Mio/Au Sable or on the White in Arkansas. I also use the 6 wt for small mousing and Hex action – big, bushy flies, that are wind resistant and require something with a little more stiffness to deliver.”

See below for a review of the Axiom ll from Trident Fly Fishing.

Axiom ll vs Axiom ll-X

The application of the Kevlar thread is what further sets this rod apart. This is very apparent when comparing it to the Axiom II-X.

The placement/location of kevlar thread on the blank is what makes the Axiom ll more medium fast, while the Axiom ll-X, is a step faster and stiffer. In other words, the Axiom ll-X is meant for those with a more aggressive hauling hand and precisely timed casting stroke. While the Axiom ll can accommodate the intermediate style caster, with a varying casting stroke and prefers more immediate rod feel.

*For a more in-depth review of the comparison between the Axiom ll and the Axiom ll-X, check out this article published by Fly Fish USA.*

Photo: Jo Randall

Kevlar Strength

The wrap of Kevlar thread along the blank prevents the blank from ovaling. This occurs when weight is loaded onto the blank when moving heavy lines and flies, or when really having to reach out and make a long shot at a fish, (more line, more mass outside of the rod tip), Kevlar keeps the blank round, and keeps it from collapsing – which means more line moving efficiency, and no loss of power or distance on the cast.

While we cannot go into specifics on the thread, and what section of the blank it is emphasized on, just know, you get a different feel between the two rods, and that is intentional.

McDonald’s may not tell you exactly how they make their special Big Mac sauce so good, but you know it is, and sometimes that should be enough.

Photo: Oliver Sutro

 

 

 

Revisiting “Made for The Outdoors: Hows Its Made – TFO Rods” with Bill Sherck

Not many anglers actually know about the process of how they’re fishing rods are made. Luckily, in 2017, we had the opportunity to partner up with Sportsman Channel’s Made For The Outdoors TV  to show the world exactly how both TFO fly and conventional rods are made. If you haven’t seen both of these videos, do yourself a favor and check them out below. The amount of detail, time, and focus that goes into each step of the rod building process is incredible, and we are honored to have such a hard working and talented team that makes it all happen.

We recently connected with TFO Ambassador and Made For The Outdoors TV host Bill Sherck to revisit these videos and his trip overseas to where TFO rods are born.

What still stands out to you the most about your visit to the South Korea factory where both the fly and conventional rods are made?

There are a bunch of things that stand out about the trip. First off, BJ is the most passionate rod builder I have ever met. He is a very technical guy who understands all the engineering and hi-tech materials, all the stuff that regular anglers don’t always comprehend or appreciate…But more importantly, BJ loves to fish! He has so many GREAT fish stories from his adventures. You can tell that passion translates into how BJ and his team build rods.  I’m talking about the tapers for all kinds of specific species of fish, how each rod feels in hand, how each rod looks.  

Conventional Category Manager Jim Shulin with TFO’s rod engineer B.J.

This is TFO’s facility. This isn’t some place where builders manufacture a bunch of rods and throw in TFO’s order when it comes through. BJ and his team build only TFO rods.  That is why these rods are so darn perfect.

The other very special part of our trip was watching BJ’s crew build each rod.   They are handcrafted.  From the hand cutting of the materials to shaping blanks to painting and building grips. Each station and each step of the process was so much fun to watch. I loved the discerning eyes. It seemed like every person was always looking at details.   

The crew is definitely a closer-knit family than any other place I’ve been. They work hard and they play hard.  Literally! The team works together, and then they take a mid-day break and walk to lunch together where they eat as a team (I believe BJ provides their meals) and then they walk back to the facility and grind out games of ping pong and checkers before getting back to rod building. 

Of all the steps and processes involved, what surprised you the most? Was there a procedure in rod making that you never thought would have been a part of the process?

It was funny, but I was wandering around the facility and discovered a complete guide wrapping/rod wrapping area sitting in the dark collecting dust.  Why in the world…Because BJ had good friends across town who are the best in the business at wrapping guides. BJ shares that part of the rod building process with those people. I love that every day, TFO drives completed blanks over to their friends who wrap and finish all of the guides and then drive those completed rods back to TFO for final assembly.  A very cool part of the process to experience (outside of the dried fish sitting on all the wrapping machines.  Turns out it’s a sign of good luck for those employees).

BJ and the TFO team take great pride in where they build the rods.  Incheon/Seoul area is a global manufacturing hub know for some of the world’s biggest technology names.  Samsung, Kia, SAP.  TFO fits right in. They don’t pretend to make the most rods, but they are absolutely convinced they make the best and they do so with the most passion.

Winter Rainbows in Alaska with Sierra Baldwin

Winter is here guys!! The days in Alaska are getting shorter and much, much colder! Frozen waders and rod guides, cold fingers and toes, frozen flies…the list goes on. Honestly though, when a big rainbow is on the end of your line, all those obstacles seem completely irrelevant. 

Photo: Clayton Longfellow

Fishing in Alaska is pretty dang awesome during any season, but there’s just something so special about fly fishing for rainbows in the midst of the colder months. I’ve lived in Alaska my whole life, and I’ve always LOVED winter. So, when winter is here, I don’t want to miss a second of it.

Fishing in extreme cold definitely has its pros and cons. The coldest I’ve fished on the river, I started the day at -8 degrees, and the high for the day was 5 degrees! I do a lot of ice fishing as well, and the coldest day I’ve had was -25 degrees! You will NOT find me on the river in temps as low as that! 

Of all the species of fish, I don’t think I could choose a favorite to target. I want to say I favor rainbow fishing in the winter just a little because it’s so different from everything else I do throughout the year. It’s definitely more of a challenge, which also makes it more rewarding.

This time of year, the water has dropped a ton (hopefully), and the fish are in different areas. Once that water drops, rainbows like the deeper trenches, but keep in mind you need good current to drift or swing through.

Winter in Alaska (and a lot of places) can have some pretty significant swings in temperatures. Here, it can be 20 degrees one day, and then in the single digits the next. Keep in mind that trout need to adapt to that intense temperate change before they turn back on.

Rainbows, especially on the Kenai River, never go hungry. With our massive salmon population, they have more than plenty to eat. Even more so on pink salmon years! On the Kenai, pink salmon only run every other year (every even year). Super odd, but can’t complain though! That only makes the trout extra chunky! Speaking of food..

Photo: Clayton Longfellow

Flies & Presentation

In the winter, the trout rely on mostly flesh and eggs. The silvers are the last of the salmon to enter the river, which means they’re still lingering around and waiting to spawn late fall/early winter. The egg drop/bead bite is unreal this time of year. 

Silver eggs are 8mm in size, so throughout the fall and winter, using this size painted bead is pretty successful. 10mm’s are a good choice when the water is dirty. I like to use my own paint on top of the painted beads to make my own special colors! This gives the bead more of a realistic look and will make it stand out compared to the ones they see regularly.

Now, my favorite topic – swinging flies! The majority of my time winter fly fishing consists of swinging flies. My favorite flies for rainbows are different leech variations, intruders, and sculpins! I prefer this method of fishing because of the precise control you have over your fly presentation and the art form that comes with casting. Also, you get to feel the fish take, instead of watching your indicator go under. 

Rods, Reels, Line/Leader Setups & More!

Sink tips are a key factor with swinging flies. You have to have the right amount of length and weight for that specific day. Alaska has some weird weather, so the water levels are constantly changing.

If your sink tip is too light, you’ll be fishing too high up in the water column, and the swing will be too fast. If you’re fishing heavy, your fly will be dredging bottom and swinging too slow. 

Rod weight matters too! If your rod is too light, you won’t be able to throw heavier sink tips effectively. For medium-large flies, I recommend at least a 7wt rod.

Photo: Clayton Longfellow

The 7wt Axiom II Switch casts light and heavy sink tips effortlessly. Hands down, my favorite rod for swinging flies. You also need a reel that won’t give up on you as it’s almost completely frozen, and a rainbow decides to make a big run. I trust the Power Reels with all my heart! 

Photo: Clayton Longfellow

As for my single-hand set up, I am currently using the Axiom II-X in a 6wt, paired with the BVD-SD Reel. The impressive back bone and power in this rod truly makes a difference when casting on freezing cold days, and through winds.

Photo: Clayton Longfellow

I hope you guys enjoyed learning some of my winter rainbow fishing methods. I could seriously talk about it forever, but I think I covered some basics for now. Wishing all of you good luck on your winter fishing adventures this season! And if you don’t like winter, you’re missin’ out.

Blog written by Alaska based TFO Ambassador Sierra Baldwin. Photos provided by Sierra and were taken by Clayton Longfellow.

 

Why You Need A 7 Weight

Let’s talk 7 weights. Yes, 7 weights.

Wait, so you’re going to stand there calling yourself a fly angler, and you don’t have a 7 weight?

Well, maybe this will open your mind to a different rod weight.

Often skipped over by the fly shop employee for the more commercially popular 8 weight, and not as common in a drift boat as the old-school, six-weight with a half-wells grip.

The 7 weight serves an important purpose for both the fresh and saltwater anglers.

And frankly, they’re a lot more fun to fight a fish on and can deliver a big fly just as well as the heavier rods in the line-up.

By adding a 7 weight to the quiver, you’ll be able to cover just about everything from large trout, to bass and carp. Don’t forget steelhead and a few inshore saltwater species.

With most anglers already owning a 5 weight, the 7 weight is a perfect next rod to have. Already have a little 3 weight for small flies? Boom, 3-5-7, a perfect way to go, and you are covered for about every scenario.

Let’s breakdown some of the current TFO 7 weights, and see which one might make a home in your line-up.

The Blue Ribbon + BVK-SD reel. Photo: Cameron Mosier

7904 Blue Ribbon, (That’s a 7weight., 9-foot, four-piece rod for those unfamiliar with the TFO model lingo):

New to the line up this year, the Blue Ribbon series has been an all around hit, but the focus here is the largest rod in the series.

The 7 weight in particular has the ability to cast a big, air resistant fly repeatedly with minimal work. Paired with a thick diameter fly line, like the SA Mastery Series Titan, big flies are an ease. This series was based off of the popular Mangrove fly rods. Medium-fast action. Medium stiffness. This rod has plenty of power in the butt to pick-up and move heavy rigs, with minimal back casts.

For those considered this isn’t “enough rod,” or why don’t you have an 8 weight?

Believe me, this rod has the power. It can even handle some of this silly-multi streamer rigs thrown out west…Yes, I am looking at you Colorado anglers.

Outside of a great action for repetitive casting and quick shots along the bank, this rod also features the built-in hook keeper. A neat little aid for quickly attaching your fly.

While this was designed as trout rod, I’ve fished it for a few summers with big popping bugs for bass. Carp anglers, here you go. Perfect for those hulking brutes, (in really arm climates, check out the SA Grand Slam line) it’ll move the big flies and not get so kinky when hot out.

Pairs well with the NXT BLK III or BVK SD III.

7wt LK Legacy with BVK-SD reel. Photo: Nick Conklin

7904 LK Legacy:

First, we designed it with stronger top sections.

What does that mean?

For those that get in bad fish fighting angles, (Seriously, keep the rod tip low! They are designed to carry a fly line, the butt section is for fighting the fish!). The reinforced top sections will help fight against high-stick breaks.

The rod also has a faster style action. For those like something with a little quicker response and stouter butt, this 7 weight is for you.

Whether fishing floating lines, or sink-tips the LK Legacy will respond quickly and help aid the angler in an accurate fly delivery.

This rod, with a 10-foot sink tip beat the banks hard this fall in search of Montana trout. It handled the more dense tip and all kinds of articulated and feathery, peanut envy’s, sex dungeons, husker-dos, husker-don’ts and just about everything I could chuck out there.

Salty folks may want to consider this on your next trip. Whether it’s reds or specs, this rod can more than handle bonefish. Rig it up with a RIO Bonefish or Redfish style line, you won’t be disappointed.

Pairs well with the NXT BLK III or BVK SD III.

Axiom ll with the Power Reel. Excellent smallmouth rod. Photo: Jim Shulin

7904 Axiom II:

Looking for a step-up in power, and something a little faster, but still have a little soul to feel the rod do the work?

Enter the 7904 Axiom II.

This rod definitely how the power in the butt section to fight, much larger than advertised for a seven, it also allows the angler to load and unload efficiently, especially with big flies.

The striper folks out in the Calif., Delta have put this rod to test the last few years, with great results. This rod can definitely handle the west coast stripers.

Pairs well with the BVK SD III or the Power II reel.

7wt Axiom ll-X paired with the BVK-SD reel. Photo: Oliver Sutro

7904 Axiom II-X:

This is the big dog in the seven-weight offerings from TFO.

The fastest and stiffest rod in the line-up, this is for the angler with a fine-tuned cast that likes power and quick recovery.

While it excels at distance, maybe you’ve seen the photos of Blane Chocklett laying long, delicate casts, it more than stands on its own with quick shots and big flies.

Another rod that does well with heavier sink-tips and even the super long 20 to 30 foot sinkers. Striped bass anglers should be fired up about this one, long heavy sinking lines and big Clouser style flies are fun on this rod. The SA Sonar series pair very well with the A2X.

Pairs well with the BVK SD III or the Power II reel.

TFO Holiday Gift Ideas – 2020 Edition

It’s hard to believe we’re already upon the holiday season, but here we are again! If you’re having trouble finding the right gift for the angler in your life, we’ve put together a list of items that won’t break the bank, but will be sure to be a great surprise for the recipient.

TFO Apparel – New Items Added!

Just in time for the holidays, the TFO Apparel Store has added some new items! Rep your favorite rod company with a TFO t-shirt, hat/beanie, baseball tee, hoodie/jacket and more!

tforods.com/swag

Lefty Kreh Koozie, Decal & Poster Pack

Add some inspiration to your fly tying room/area with a little bit of Lefty Kreh.

Lefty Kreh will always be a legend in the world of fishing. He was a true original and he helped TFO pioneer the concept of affordable high-performance fly rods. At Temple Fork Outfitters, we’re forever grateful for all that he gave of himself to us and our favorite sport.

Lefty regularly shared his passion in the way of teaching and in being kind to others, which often lit a fire in the hearts of those that knew him. That’s why above being a great angler, we remember him as a great friend and hope you’ll find this pack of Lefty Kreh nostalgia as a way to remember him as we do: smiling.

Artwork by Paul Puckett. Get your koozie, decal and poster pack while supplies last. Fish the Original ™

Decal Dimensions: 4″ x 5″ | Poster Dimensions: 16″ x 20″

https://tforods.com/lefty-kreh-pack/

Reel Case, Rod Tubes, Rod & Reel Carriers

Whether on a boat, car or plane, transporting your gear while keeping it protected from damages is extremely important. Keep you gear safe with a rod tube, rod/reel carriers, and reel cover.

https://tforods.com/fly-rod-reel-cases/

BVK-SD Reel

We can’t always predict where fish will be, but we can do our best to be prepared to get to any depth that fish might be holding. This is where having a different type of line (full sink, sink tip, intermediate, floating) comes in hand, and if you have another line, you’re going to need another reel (or backup spool) to hold it. The BVK-SD is a great primary and/or back up reel. The sealed drag functionality gives you even more confidence for playing bigger fish when needed.

https://tforods.com/bvk-sd-reels/

Traveler

While this year may not have been a great year to travel, 2021 is looking a lot more promising. Whether you’re just looking for a compact fishing rod to transport to the lake, or if you’re looking for a great inshore rod to take with you on the plane for your beach trip, but don’t want to worry about traveling with a one-piece rod, the Traveler is an excellent, and reliable choice.

https://tforods.com/traveler-rods/

Fly Fishing the LA River, Urban Carp Fishing With Jimmy Kimmel, Green Eggs & Ham + More with Lino Jubilado

Not many people associate fly fishing with the LA River, however for TFO Ambassador Lino Jubilado, catching carp on the fly on the LA River is something he’s been spending almost every weekend doing since he was a teenager. Like many urban fishing locations, the setting may not be the most attractive, however it can give anglers (and inspiring anglers) a chance to catch fish right in their backyard without having to drive miles away to a river, lake, or ocean.

After being fairly active on social media and sharing his LA River carp on the fly adventures with the world, Lino has met many people, including late night show host, Jimmy Kimmel. This week we chat with Lino to find out how he got started fly fishing, how he got into catching carp on the fly specifically, his unique approach to targeting carp, the soon to be famous Green Eggs and Ham carp pattern, and his experiences fishing with Jimmy Kimmel.

How long have you been fly fishing, and what got you specifically interested in fishing for carp on the fly?

I have been fly fishing since the 1980’s. I got my first fly rod when I was 14. I caught my first carp in the late 80s when I was high school, and I remember catching it on a fly that I tied from a fly tying kit that I had. I believe it was on a royal coachman of all things (laughs). Back then, we had to sneak into the river, as it was illegal to access.

I’ve been fly fishing exclusively for about 15 years now. Prior to that, I used to fish bass tournaments professionally with conventional gear. I just got tired of the egos and pressures of fishing competitively and I wanted to try something different, so I got into fly fishing.

Did someone you know fly fish? What made you interested in fly fishing?

I was actually at a fishing show with my Dad when I was 14 and there was a guy on stage demonstrating it. The instructor asked if I wanted to learn and I said “Sure!”. He pulled me up on stage and taught me in front of everyone. After I left there, I was super interested and asked my Dad to get me a fly rod.

Targeting carp on the fly is pretty popular today, but I can’t see that being a common species (no pun intended) for a 14 year old in the 80s to want to go after. Was that on purpose or was it just a fun bycatch for you?

I was not intending to catch carp at all when I first started. I was actually going for bass, bluegill, and sunfish. I didn’t even know carp were in the LA River. I grew up fishing it catching sunfish and bass, but had no idea carp were in there. Over the years, as I met other anglers that fished the LA River, there became a community of carp anglers – specifically fly anglers.

I didn’t get really active on social media until the last 3 years, but I’ve noticed that lately, catching carp on the fly has become a really popular type of fishing everywhere and I’m seeing it all over Instagram. Our group/community has been fishing for carp well before social media, so it’s been fun to see people catching carp in all parts of the world. I’ve met a lot of other carp anglers through Instagram as well.

Although not as scenic as rivers in Montana, the LA River can hold carp, bass and sunfish of good sizes! Photo: Lino Jubilado

What types of locations or rivers are you going after carp?

Mostly the LA River, but I try to get out and fish lakes in the outside area. I send my flies to people all over to see how effective they are on other fisheries. The LA River holds a lot of common and mirror carp, so I stay pretty busy fishing it.

As you started focusing more towards carp on the fly, how did you learn to increase your chances of success on the water? Was it from advice from your local community of anglers, or just getting out there and figuring it out.

A little bit of both. Sitting at the vice and just tying bugs that mimic what I would see in the river. One time, I saw some workers cutting the grass near the river and watched these carp gorge on these blades of grass downstream of where the grass trimings were flowing/blown into the water. I went home and tied up a blade of grass imitation and it worked! Through the years, these fish been hard to figure out. They can totally change their diet day by day. That what makes them so challenging!

You fish for carp on the fly a little bit differently that other anglers. Tell us a little bit about that.

I actually utilize a strike indicator when I fish for carp, which isn’t a common method apparently. People will comment on my Instagram posts all the time saying “How do you fish for carp with an indicator?” I realized quickly that most people are sight fishing these fish rather than using an indicator in water that typically holds carp.

I like to use a pattern that I tie called the Green Eggs & Ham. I’ve lost track of how many carp I’ve caught on the LA River with that fly and I use it exclusively with the strike indicator. With that indicator I can detect the slightest vibration or movement.

Lino’s famous Green Eggs & Ham carp pattern.

What kind of indicator do you like to use?

My go-to is a ½ inch airlock – the smaller the better. Orange is my favorite color for visibility, but if I notice they’re getting spooked by the indicator, I will switch over to white to mimic the bubbles.

Different types of indicators possible for carp fishing on the fly, but the air lock (buttom right) is a favorite for Lino.

Carp can be very finicky. How much does stealth play when you’re fishing for carp in your fisheries? Do you have a specific technique or tips for how to approach carp?

The nice thing about a strike indicator is I can pretty much stay away, and like trout fishing, let the fly drift as naturally as possible. I’m not constantly on my feet trying to get into casting/drop & drag range. Carp are super spooky, so keeping my distance with the indicator really helps me increase my chances of not spooking a fish.

It is very important to approach the water very quietly. Carp have a lateral line that make them super sensitive to vibrations in the water. You put your foot in the water, and they know you’re there already. It takes a lot of patience because when you do walk in the water they’ll know you’re there and spook off, but if you’re patient and stand your ground, they’ll come back and you can get another shot at them.

Also be sure to work areas that you know are holding fish thoroughly. Especially as we transition into cooler weather. With colder water, the fish will get super lethargic. They’ll still eat, but you really have to get the fly right in their face.

I see where you’re using the Axiom ll-X a lot. What size/weight do you like to use?

I love using the 5wt Axiom ll-X. Even in the more open water, the back bone is what’s important, and the Axiom ll-X has backbone for days! Just put that side pressure on that fish and you’ll tame that thing very quickly.

The Axiom ll-X is probably the first 5wt weight I’ve ever had that has a fighting butt and I love it, especially when fighting carp.

I’ve also been using the new LK Legacy TH 13′ 7wt paired with the BVK SD lll+. I might be the first spey’n carp anglers (laughs).

Any specific lines, leaders, tippet you like to use?

I like to use a floating line. From the fly line, I’ll do a 5’ leader of a colored mono (bright green) to a tippet ring. From there I’ll put on a 4 to 5 foot piece of 10lb fluorocarbon. My indicator usually goes right above the tippet ring so it doesn’t slide down.

Recently you fished with Jimmy Kimmel. Can you talk about that experience?

Definitely – So I mentioned earlier that I only really got into Instagram about three years ago. A few years back Jimmy Kimmel started following my account. I figured it was a spam account or something random, but I had also heard through the grapevine that he was a big time fly fisherman. I started looking at his site and sure enough I came across some hints that he fly fished!

Earlier this summer, he actually reached out to me on Instagram! He had a buddy, Chef Adam Perry Lang, that had a birthday coming up and he wanted to help him catch a carp on the fly. He asked if I’d be willing to help make that happen. I was like “Absolutely!”

We met up and I took them down to the river and within the first ten minutes his buddy Adam caught one!

Lino, Jimmy Kimmel, and Chef Perry Lang enjoying some carp fishing on the LA River.

Very cool! How did Jimmy do?

Jimmy hooked up six times, but unfortunately, he lost all six! He was doing great, and doing nothing wrong, but sometimes you have those days where fish break off before you have a chance to net or land them. He was so upset he said he wanted to come back. We haven’t had a chance to meet up again for that but as a thank you, he invited me and my family out to his lodge in Idaho to do some fishing.

I had the best trip of my life there. I’ve never caught so many trout in my life. I took one morning to go fish the Blackfoot Reservoir because I heard they had monster mirror carp there. I went out and caught my biggest carp ever on a 6wt!

 

That’s awesome! Do you and him still keep up?

We do! He’s a lot busier now, but he emailed me and asked me how the fishing was at his lodge. He still comments and likes my posts all the time. Hopefully we’ll get back on the water again soon!

Sounds and looks like you take a lot of people fishing with you. That’s great that you are able to introduce new people to your fishery and the experience of catching carp on the fly.

That’s the beauty of Instagram. I’m taking people all over the world down to the river now. It’s like a hobby of mine to get people on carp. Every weekend I’m taking someone new, sometimes people who don’t even fish because they’re fascinated by catching carp on the fly.

Kesley Gallagher with a carp caught on 12lb test. This was a record for a large carp (14lbs) on light tippet. Lino found a spot loaded with fish, gave Kesley a green eggs and ham pattern and let her go to work.
Lino helping fellow TFO Ambassador Brian Leon catch his first LA River carp on the fly.

Any tips or suggestions for people looking to try fishing for carp on the fly. Where they might be looking for carp opportunities in there area?

That’s what’s great about carp is that they aren’t exclusive to certain areas of the world. No matter where you live, you can probably find carp in a body of water near you. Take your time and remember to be patient. These fish can spook very easily so remember that patience goes a long way! Don’t be afraid to throw an indicator on when fishing bodies of water with moving water.

Swing Season Prep – Choosing The Right Rod, Reel, & Line

“When the day get shorter, darker and colder, most anglers lament even getting out of their warm beds…if you are a swinger, the coffee is brewing and you are more then pumped to get on the road and step into a run.

Dries flies aren’t really coming off, the hopper-dropper crowds have all but vanished and the fair weather anglers are at home prepping for a day of running errands and ambling around Home Depot killing time.

There is something about swinging flies.

Long rods, a pocket full of flies and sink tips.

Deep glassy runs, foggy eyes and cold toes.

It’s an exercise in patience and consistency, (and some kind of dark attitude to deal with the long hours and sparse hook-ups).

Strip, strip, strip, cast. Take a step. Put your hand in the fleece liner.

Wash, rinse, repeat.

Photo: Lance Nelson

Maybe you’ll push that steelhead far enough back into the pool, piss it off enough for a strike.

Maybe you’ll cover enough water and hit that big trout laying low, get a strike on the dangle.

The hours and days drag on. You over think the the purples, blues and blacks of your flies. Maybe you switch out tips. The desire to move spots looms heavy.

Those with a weaker constitution may say, “F**K it,” and go out hide out in a nearby dive bar or nap in the truck.

Others considering tossing their two-handed rod into the trash and getting out the spoon rod.

More time to stand and think, the motions become repetitive, you start playing with different anchor points.

You start to drift off….

and then…..a thump…..”

Nick Conklin – Temple Fork Outfitters Fly Fishing Product Category Manager

Photo: Lance Nelson

 

If you’re reading this, and are interested in learning more about two-handed fly fishing, you’re in luck. Below is a basic breakdown of swing seasons, as well as rod/reel recommendations. Be on the lookout for more blogs and posts on swing season, but this should help you get started if you’re new to this type of fishing, and curious about what rod or reel to get.

 

LATE SUMMER/FALL STEELHEAD

When swinging flies later in the summer, before the rains come and the days become cold and short, a lighter shorter rod can be a lot of fun.

The 12-foot, 6-weight LK Legacy two-handed rod is perfect set-up weather your are fishing scandi floating lines and more classic patterns, or throwing small to medium intruders and weighted flies. This rod will also handle multi-density tips, from T-8 to T-11. The faster, stiffer road allows for smooth line pick-up and repositioning.

Rod: 6120-4 LK

Reel: BVK SD 3.5

Line: Scandi 400-440, Skagit 425-475.

The LK Legacy TH Photo: Oliver Sutro
BVK-SD reels paired with the LK Legacy TH – Photo: Nick Conklin

WINTER STEELHEAD

When picking a good winter setup I think it’s important to find a rod that will fit the size and type of water you are fishing. Swinging a deep slow run from the shore, or from a boat? On a wide, sweeping river? Or fishing a tight quarters coastal river? For winter fish you’ll typically be fishing medium-to-large size intruders and sink tips up to 15-feet long.

When fishing these heavier and thick diameter skagit heads and tips, most casters will find a more deeper loading rod beneficial and easier to handle during long days. Two rod lengths I always carry are a shorter, 11 to 11’6” rod and something longer and heavier, ideally a 12 or 13’6” 8-weight.

The Axiom II Switch is a great option not just for small to medium water, but also for those who want to “switch,” techniques and have the ability to go from heads and swinging flies to an indicator or chuck- and-duck system.

The 13-foot, Pro II TH model is great for skagit heads and tips, and due to is medium-fast action it smoothly loads and unloads

Axiom ll Switch – Photo: Lance Nelson
The Pro ll TH – Photo: Lance Nelson
The Power Reel – Photo: Lance Nelson

Small to medium waters, coastal fishing:

Rod: 08 11 0 4 Axiom II Switch

Reel: BVK SD III

Line: 525 Skagit head, 10-feet of T-11 sink tip.

 

Medium to large water:

Rod: 078 13 0 4 Pro II TH

Reel: Power III

Line: 550 multi-density Skagit head, 10-feet of T-11 sink tip.

Photo: Oliver Sutro

TROUT SPEY

When it’s time to put away the dry fly rods and the big foamy terrestrials have all but been gnawed off the hook trout anglers should be eagerly looking for a longer lighter rods to swing for trout.

Having a long and light two-hander can be a lot of fun, and teach an angler a lot about seasonal holding patterns on their local trout water.

I typically like to have two, (or one rod with two line set-ups) when attacking the “trout spey,” or “micro spey,” approach. One rod will be for swinging soft hackles and little nymphs in skinny water. The second rig will be for streamers and heavier flies. On this 3/4-weight set-up, I’ll also swing a double woolly bugger set-up to give the appearance of baitfish “chasing,” each other.

Photo: Lance Nelson

Soft hackles and light flies:

Rod: 023 11 0 4 Pro II TH, (2/3-weight, 11-foot Pro II TH)

Reel: NXT BLK III

Line: 210-240 grain scandi head. 5 to 8-feet intermediate tip, or long tapered leader.

Small to medium streamers and multi-woolly bugger rigs

Rod: 034 11 0 4 Pro II TH, (3/4-weight, 11-foot, Pro II TH)

Reel: NXT BLK III

Line: 270-grain, skagit head, (13 to 15 feet long). Short sink-tip, (T-8) or a polyleader, from five to 10-feet long.

 

Fishing for Grayling in Alaska with Tessa Shetter

Alaska is downright spoiled when it comes to fishing opportunities. Endless locations, endless seasons (if you count ice fishing), and a wide range of species to choose from. Ocean, lakes, creeks, rivers, we’ve got it all!

As a born and raised Alaskan Native, I find joy from every bit of it. But for me, the one target that stands out from them all, is the arctic grayling.

Photo: Kory Robbins

Otherwise known as the sailfish of the north, grayling are absolutely stunning creatures with an array of vibrant yet translucent colors of blue, red, and silver displayed on their large and prominent dorsal fin.

In Alaska, we have arctic grayling, as opposed to the nearly identical grayling found in Europe and parts of Russia. On average, grayling are a rather small species of fish. Believe it or not, they are actually part of the family of salmon species, Salmoniformes.

Fishing in Alaska is almost like fishing in a whole different world. I often catch myself forgetting that our fishing style is much, much different up here than in the states, almost entirely due to our salmon runs. In Alaska, we use flies that imitate salmon flesh and eggs, all varying colors depending on the lifecycle of the salmon.

However, the thing that skews our very specific style of fly fishing, are our grayling. Sure, every now and then they will eat up a flesh fly or painted bead, but only if its swung in the right spot at the right time. It’s not a very consistent way of fishing for grayling, in my experience. What is consistent with grayling, however, is the type of water they are typically found in most often.

Photo: Tessa Shetter

Alaska, and many of you know, is huge. I’ve lived here my whole live and have only made it as far as Homer and Cantwell, which equidistance from Anchorage is about 300 miles each. Looking at that on a map, not a lot of ground covered. But, even within my “little” area of expertise, I’ve found where the grayling like to hang.

To put it simple, grayling like to be “up”. This means that the further “up” north you are, the more grayling there will be. The further “up” stream you are, the more grayling. If you’re in the southern part of the state, or the peninsula, the higher “up” in elevation is where you’ll find the grayling.

And within the “up”, the grayling will be peacefully laying in a slow, deep pool of clear water, just waiting for one of the bajillion mosquitoes in Alaska to land on the surface, or for a subsurface insect to chase at its level.

So, now that we’ve covered where to find grayling, let’s talk the nitty gritty of how to actually catch one.

TFO Ambassador Kory Robbins with an Alaskan grayling. Photo: Tessa Shetter

A grayling that is considered large is around 18”, giant if it reaches 20”. The largest recorded arctic grayling is 30”, which is big big.

In the areas I fish, the grayling LOVE dry flies, and I LOVE watching them hit top water. Timing is key, since grayling have the tiniest mouths you’ll ever see in a fish and more often than not, will completely miss your fly on its first surface. So, if you miss him the first time, don’t give up. Trust me, he will be back almost instantly.

Photo: Tessa Shetter

Like I said before, Alaska is home to what seems like all the mosquitoes in the world. So, anything that even slightly resembles a small insect usually works for top water fishing. There are some areas that are so remote and untouched, it’s said that a gum wrapper will fool a grayling. My favorites include the elk hair caddis, stimulator, and if I’m feeling wild, a chubby Chernobyl. And with their small mouths, I’m usually using anywhere from a size 8-14 fly.

Grayling on the Purple Chubby Chernobyl. Photo: Kory Robbins

For subsurface, a nymph, bead, and occasionally a flesh fly or leech will get their attention. Spring and fall is when you’ll have the most action with subsurface flies. This is due to the ice melting in spring runoff and releasing old salmon flesh (try a cotton candy/ham & eggs fly), and the releasing of fresh salmon flesh and eggs from the fall spawns.

Summer months are peak grayling fishing, right before and right after the salmon spawns. There are moments when the salmon push grayling out of their normal areas, and the most common tactic for that is to try a painted bead behind the salmon where the grayling are most likely waiting for eggs.

Gear-wise, you won’t need a lot. With the size and appetite of graylings, anywhere from a 3wt to a 6wt set-up is all you will need. There is the common case of catching a grayling while targeting salmon or trout, and in those situations, whatever rod you are using will work perfectly fine.

The LK Legacy & BVK-SD reel. Photo: Kory Robbins
Grayling on the Mangrove. Photo: Tessa Shetter

I would recommend the TFO Blue Ribbon when using small patterns and dry flies, and the LK Legacy single and two-handed rods when fishing subsurface for grayling to give the best presentation. The Mangrove is also an excellent choice.

From my experience, grayling don’t put up too much of a fight. In fact, when I’m not using a dry fly, I can usually sense when it’s a grayling on the end of my line by the fact that it feels like I’m reeling in a wet rag with an occasional head twitch. Totally different story when you’re using a 3wt with a dry fly, though!

The best part comes when the grayling is netted, and you can feast your eyes on that big ol’ fin. Nothing compares to the colors, shape, and overall beauty of the graylings dorsal.

Well folks, that about covers it. I hope my knowledge from experience is helpful in the journeys of seeking out grayling. Though the patterns I see and the techniques I use could be different from others, my goal is to share the knowledge I have personally gained. There’s always something new to be learned in fishing every day!

Photo: Tessa Shetter

Blog written by TFO Alaskan Ambassador Tessa Shetter. Photos provided by Tessa and TFO Alaskan Ambassador Kory Robbins.

 

 

Targeting West Coast Delta Stripers

Fall is in the air and with cooler nights upon us, striped bass anglers anticipate the fall striper bite on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. This is a precious piece of water to California and is rich in wildlife and agriculture that supplies not only water to the majority of California’s central valley but a wide range of fishing and hunting.

Striped bass were introduced to California’s San Francisco Bay in 1879 and another few hundred released once again in 1882. These fish have flourished in the early years but in recent years have declined due to a combination of things due to lack of water during drought years and water management across the state. That is a whole other topic to be discussed at another time, right now I want to talk about fall stripers!

Topwater anyone? Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

Why Fish For Striped Bass?

Striped bass, these fish grab hard, pull hard and some days your arm feels like it is going to fall off at the end of the day. We find a lot of smaller stripers called schoolies which are in the one to five pound class and can be in schools of hundreds. Then there are the moments you find a school of six to ten pounders with multiple hook ups of this size, these are days you never forget. In earlier years we used to find a decent amount of twenty pounders and plus, but we have noticed there are fewer of these monsters around these days. A good solid fish that we see commonly these days are 8-15 pounds but still see that occasional trophy in the 40 lb. to 50 lb. size.

Fall can be a very rewarding time to chase striped bass on the fly. Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

‘Tis The Season(s)

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta primarily has two striped bass seasons, Spring and Fall. In the Spring, the stripers move from the ocean and San Francisco Bay entering the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and proceeding further up the river for spawning in the spring months. We have noticed over the years not all the migratory stripers return to the Bay so quick after spawning. A good number of striped bass are continuing to stay in the river system well after the spawning due to the cooler water and the abundance of bait in the river systems. Eventually most of the striped bass head back to the Delta and Bay in late summer months and early fall following other anadromous fish like salmon smolt and steelhead smolt making their way to the ocean. In these months of late September, October and November the Delta waters become a desirable temperature for the Stripers and other fish species in the Delta.

Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

The Perfect Temperature

Bringing us to the discussion of fall stripers! The Delta water temperatures are now cooling in the fall months with the bait consisting of threadfin shad showing from the bay. Other predators such as sea lions and sea gulls have arrived as well to feed on the abundance of bait in the system. The sea gulls from above put on a show busting bait on the surface and aggressive hungry stripers attacking from below. These are the days you can have arm wrenching pulls with crazy numbers of fish. This is prime time to target the Delta for these striped bass feeding before the winter temperatures set in. Desirable water temperature for these feeding stripers are 55-65 degrees. The striper bite tends to really slow down when the water temperature gets below 55 degrees and even slower below 50 degrees. I usually see this in the later part of December. So, you have two and a half months of a prime striper bite to find that monster striper you are desperately looking to hook.

Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

Choosing The Right Rod & Reel

Targeting these striped bass when it comes to equipment, I prefer fly rods in a 9 foot, 7 to 9 weight with a good solid drag on the reel for that monster fish we are targeting. The BVK-SD reel and the Power Reel that TFO offers are two excellent reels to choose from. Some of my favorite rods are anywhere from the Mangrove, Axiom II, Axiom II-X and the new LK Legacy. The Mangrove has been a great rod for casting to selected areas where precision is a must, it loads quick and has a smooth delivery. I favor the Axiom II and the Axiom II-X for a powerful rod. This rod will deliver a heavily weighted fly at a distance cast with minimal exertion. It handles both floating and sinking lines and is very light to the hand for that long day of casting.

 

The Axiom ll + Power Reel combo make a great set up for chasing striped bass on the fly. Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

The Right Fly Lines For The Right Occasions

I use a variety of lines depending on the tide, the time of the day and water depth. This means anything from a floating line, an intermediate line to even a fast sinking line. I love to target these stripers with topwater poppers, but it can typically be a small window for this desired technique. Best conditions for this topwater bite are low light and a high tide. So, if I specifically want to target topwater stripers I look for a high tide at first light. This will give you your best opportunity to find that big blow up on your topwater fly.

Fishing an intermediate line can be a small window as well. I usually find that this line is an excellent choice when stripers are chasing or cruising for bait at high tide on a shoal or tight to the bank of three to four feet in depth.

TFO Power Reel. Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

Majority of the time I am fishing a fast sinking line on the Delta. This gives you the best opportunity to fish a lot of different depths of water. You can strip it quick for shallower water and let it dredge for that deeper water that is holding those schools of fish. This line will also help you achieve getting to that desired depth quicker than other lines in fast moving tides. The sinking fly line is usually a 24ft to 30ft sink tip with an intermediate running line. Most fly line companies build these lines now days and are offered in many different grain weights that will match up with your TFO rod that you choose to use.

Having a fast sinking line can help you get down to fish holding lower quicker. Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

What Are They Hitting?

There are so many flies to choose from, but you can keep it simple as well. I prefer a fly in a Clouser style, what I mean by that is that the fly is weighted and with the hook riding upright. This fly is great to get down to the fish and the fly performs an excellent jigging motion as you strip the fly back that stripers cannot resist. I like to have a few different sizes ranging anywhere from a size 2 to a 3/0 hook to match the bait around. Choosing colors of a fly depend on the color of the water, time of day, and the type of bait we are simulating. I primarily use Gray/White, Chartreuse/White, Olive/White and one of my specialties Olive/Pink/White that resemble a salmon or steelhead smolt.

You can’t go wrong with a box of Clousers. Photo: Toby Uppinghouse

 

Capt. Toby Uppinghouse

Edgewater Outfitters

TFO Ambassador and Advisory Staff