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A Few Tips for the Hearty Smallmouth Bass Angler

Editor’s Note: This week, we turn to TFO Ambassador Burnie Haney for a few tips on fishing for late-fall smallmouth bass. Enjoy.

When the water drops below 50 degrees, it’s the best time to down-size your presentation for consistent rod action throughout the day. In central and northern New York, our waters are running 46, 47 degrees, and when other power presentations fail to produce, light line and small baits will get you bit day in and day out.

This past Friday my bass tournament teammate (Mike Cusano) and I fished Oneida Lake with the TFO Professional Series TFG PSS 703-1 paired with 5.1:1 spinning reels loaded with 4 or 6-pound test to present 2.8 and 3-inch Keitech swimbaits on 1/8 or 3/16-ounce jig heads.

Our best presentation was a long-distance cast with a slow steady retrieve. We wanted our baits to imitate the small size forage base of perch and shad, and these little swimbaits baits work perfectly for this application.

Often times in tournament fishing we hear anglers talk about employing a stop-and-go retrieve to help generate strikes. However, when it comes to cold water bassin’ I believe a slow steady retrieve works best especially for smallmouth. My theory: Since the water is colder, the fish usually react a bit slower. If they can find forage in open water that’s slowing passing by, they’re going to hit it nine times out of ten rather than let it go.

We employed this presentation with good results on a recent Friday and knew we could duplicate it on Sunday in the 2018 Brian Rayle Go Anywhere Tournament on Oneida Lake. During the tournament we landed 35 bass and 20 perch, with our five best bass weighing 21.31 pounds, which beat the second-place team by more than a 2-pound margin.

A lot of anglers put their boats away once the late fall hunting starts, and when they do, they leave behind some of the best smallmouth bass fishing of the season.

So the moral of this story is the next time you find yourself surrounded by cold-water smallmouth bass, in gin clear water, make sure you have a TFO Professional Series TFG PSS 703-1 rod paired with a 5.1:1 reel loaded with 4-6 lb. test and a handful of small swimbaits with 1/8 or 3/16th oz. jig heads.

Trust me on this one, you’ll be glad you’re properly geared up to enjoy all-day rod action.

Additional thoughts on smallmouth tactics? Let us know on one of our social media pages.

TFO Ambassador Tucker Smith Basking in the Glow of a Championship Run

TFO Ambassador Tucker Smith helped Briarwood Christian win the 2018 Mossy Oak Bassmaster High School National Championship this past summer. The Birmingham, Ala. resident joined with Briarwood Christian teammate Grayson Morris to prevail in the prestigious Paris, Tenn. event.

Smith chatted with TFO blog editor Mike Hodge about his championship run, his favorite tactics for bass, his mentor Joey Nania and his goals down the road among other things. Below are excerpts from last week’s interview.

TFO: How much did the national title mean to you?

TS: “That (win) meant everything, because the past year I’ve focused on fishing a lot. I quit all the (other) sports. Fishing’s my only thing right now. It means the world to me. I started fishing when I was … I’ve been fishing since as long as I can remember. It’s all I’ve ever wanted to do. It’s my biggest passion.”

TFO: What was the key to victory for you in that tournament?

TS: “Staying in one spot, focusing in and being patient, waiting for those key bites. We knew we were around fish. We had to keep fishing and not give up, because we knew the fish were there. Basically, it was a matter of being patient.”

TFO: Do you have any tournaments coming up, any more events you’re looking forward to?

TS: “Our high school season just started. Bass Nation, all the tournaments are just starting up. I plan to fish around fifteen team tournaments this year, but with weekend tournaments maybe a little more than that.”

TFO: Do you have any short-term goals you want to accomplish in the next year or two?

TS: “Obviously a goal is to win the (national) championship again. A smaller goal is to qualify for it. Qualifying is hard. It’s a huge deal. Sometimes it’s harder to qualify than the actual tournament. We qualified at Toledo Bend. We had never been there before. It was tough, but we got third in that one, so. ..”

TFO: Any long-term goals, maybe to fish competitively in college?

TS: “I’ve been looking at Montevallo, Bethel and Auburn. When we won the championship, we got a scholarship to Bethel. I don’t know if I want go there or not.”

TFO: Anytime someone competes, they usually get something out of it, whether it’s basketball, baseball or football? What do you get out of fishing?

TS: “It’s my favorite thing to do. You can win money doing it. I think that’s really cool when you do something that you love and can get money out of it. That’s great, especially as a high school angler. I would never think that’s something you could do. That’s really cool.”

TFO: What appeals to you about bass fishing?

TS: “The camaraderie. I’ve gained so many friends from fishing. I know people from different schools that I fish with. All of my buddies. We all hang out on the lake and stuff. It’s good to get together with people and have fun.”

TFO: What’s your favorite way to catch bass? Your favorite tactic?

TS: “In the national championship, I was using a Chatterbait. That’s probably my favorite way to fish. I’m a power fisherman. I don’t like the finesse stuff as much. I’ll do it if I have to.”

TFO: Any advice you’d give to those who want to improve their fishing?

TS: “Time on the water is the most important thing. I fished ponds to start out and fished until I got those techniques down, then moved on to the lakes. Time on the water makes you better. You have to spend time on the water to find the fish.”

TFO: What do you think of TFO’s equipment, the rods?

TS: “I’m really good friends with (TFO Ambassador) Joey Nania. He’s been my fishing mentor. I grew up fishing with him. He introduced me to (TFO’s) rods. I’ve been fishing them ever since. I love them. They’re not too heavy and they’ve got great action. The 7-3 Heavy, you can throw so many things on that.”

TFO: What about the Pacemaker series? Do you like those rods?

TS: “I do. I just ordered eleven rods from (Bass Category Manager) Collins (Illich). I just got some Pacemakers. I haven’t fished with them a lot yet, but I like them so far.”

TFO: What’s the biggest thing you’ve learned from Joey?

TS: “How to locate fish. The best thing he taught me is finding fish deep. A lot of people can fish the bank, but not a lot of people can look at their graphs, find fish and catch them. I’m a shallow guy, but catching fish when it’s cold is a real big key.”

 

Be sure to follow Tucker, Joey, Cliff Pace and other TFO ambassadors/advisors on one of our social media channels.

The Trials and Tribulations of Trailer Ownership

I plugged in the last wire into the trailer hitch as darkness descended. Moments from cranking the ignition on my Jeep, I realized the moment of truth had arrived.

Either the lights were going to work, or they weren’t. It was a zero-sum game I played for several weeks while trying to fix a trailer I had bought for my Flycraft, a fly-fishing raft I assumed I could car top. The key word in that sentence is assumed. The raft is way too bulky to hoist on my Grand Cherokee roof after a day of fishing.

So it was back to the drawing board and I decided to buy a trailer off Craig’s List. When I first got the trailer home, everything seemed fine. Even though it was a 2003 Triton LT, the original owner had kept it in good shape. There was very little rust or wear and tear.

I paid $500. A very fair price.

With a Trailer, One Thing Leads to Another

The problems started as soon as I hooked up the lights to my Jeep. Everything worked, except the left turn signal.

I told myself not to panic. Maybe a bulb or a loose connection? Worst-case scenario: A bad tail light, right?

So I headed to Advance Auto thinking I was in for a quick fix. The bulb didn’t work. I replaced the tail light. That didn’t work. At that point, I knew I was in trouble. Think Wile E. Coyote with his ACME instructions after once again being bamboozled by the Road Runner. Ironically, that was my favorite cartoon as a kid. Whenever I have to fix something around the house, I sympathize with Mr. Wile E. Coyote.

In all, I made an additional nine or 10 trips to Advance Auto for …

Connectors

Adapters

Screws/bolts

Lubricant

Wire cutters

Fuses

Butt connectors

Wire terminals

Perseverance Is a Necessity with a Trailer

In a perfect world, I would have bought all of these things in one trip.  Of course, that assumes I diagnosed the problem correctly, went right to the source and fixed it. Trailers and electronics don’t work that way, trust me. I started at the back of the trailer, probed and then worked my way forward to the Jeep.

Was it the vehicle or the trailer? I wasn’t sure.

Initially, I assumed it was the Jeep’s electronics. Having lived in the saltwater of Northeast Florida with a Gheenoe, the brine had left my connector and adapter with a bit of corrosion. I replaced those, hooked everything back up. Still no left turn signal. My test light showed no power to the proper (yellow) wire.

I was stumped, a bit disappointed, but not defeated. I took a few days off and tried again, searching for clues. During one particularly frustrating afternoon, I then noticed that the right turn signal was not working.

I looked toward my hitch and noticed that there was a green wire from a wad of electrical tape near the front of the wiring harness. Initially, I had thought the tape was designed to shorten the harness. It was not. Say hello to a re-attached harness.

I removed the tape, and a bundle of wires — some connected, some not —- emerged. The green wire, which controls the right turn signal, was loose. I had found the issue, but could I sort through the connections? There were six wires coming from the trailer and only five from the four-way, wishbone connector. Matching color to color usually works, but not in this instance. There were two ground wires coming from the trailer — unlike traditional trailers Triton runs separate grounds —- leaving me with no idea of where the second ground would go. With my old trailer, the ground wire was bolted to the metal frame. Triton trailers are aluminum. So much for that option.

Not sure what to do, I wired one ground to the black wire, and the other ground to the matching white, cranked up the car and nary a light came on. I disconnected everything and probed with the test light and soon discovered I had no power anywhere. I had regressed and was on the verge of a meltdown. I grabbed a beer and texted my dad, who told me to take a break: I had probably blown a fuse.

The next day, I called Triton to ask about the extra ground. Their rep told me to connect all three grounds together. Simple. It was back to Auto Zone twice to mix, match and test fuses. Once I navigated the maze of the Jeep’s fuse box, I got power back to the hitch. On a roll, I connected the loose wires of the harness back together with electrical tape. I checked for power at the turn signal. Eureka. The current finally flowed.

The Road Less Traveled with a Trailer

I had a decision to make. Either I wing it with electrical tape and hope for the best. Or, better yet, I secure all of the questionable connections with heat shrink.  Back to Advance Auto Parts for the latter.

When I showed up at the store, the clerks were ready to greet me.

“If you keep showing up here, we’re going to have to hire you,” one said.

“I’m close. This is my last trip,” I replied.

It was about six in the evening. I had about two hours left before darkness settled in.

I took my time with each wire. First I connected, then I crimped, then I heated and sealed.

I hooked up the trailer as the sun set over the North Carolina mountains. And the lights came on.

Trailer horror stories of your own? Trailer advice? Let us know know on one of our social media pages.

Five Tips on How to Catch Tarpon

The Gold Cup features the best of the best in tarpon fishing. The invitation-only tournament is one of the most prestigious events of the competitive fishing season. TFO advisor Rob Fordyce has set the standard for Gold Cup consistency with 13 second-place finishes, the last of which came earlier this summer.

And he’s always learning.

“I’ve never been satisfied with my knowledge of tarpon,” Fordyce said. “I take fishing seriously. I do it for a living. Tarpon fishing, I take to a different level. That consistent (success) comes from never being satisfied with my knowledge of the game. I’m always trying new things and I’m trying to get better at it.”

TFO blog editor Mike Hodge chatted with Fordyce about his success, and the host of the outdoor series, Seahunter, offered a few tips. Among them:

Get In Shape

Tarpon fishing is not for the meek. It’s physical and fast paced. Many newbies assume the rough stuff comes once the big fish is hooked, and there’s no doubt your biceps, core and thighs will burn as you try to land your quarry.

Often overlooked, though, are the skills needed before the hookup. Good balance is essential. Why? Because if you fish the flats near a pass or a beach, swells can rock the boat. Sea legs aren’t a big deal for a hardened tarpon fisherman, but the newcomer needs to be strong and flexible to maintain good enough balance to spot fish and make accurate casts.

“It’s not a controlled environment,” Fordyce said. “A trout fishing setting is somewhat of a controlled environment. The fish aren’t moving. The fish are holding behind a rock and you know which rock that is. If you make a bad cast in a trout scenario, you get another shot. In tarpon fishing on the ocean side, there can be wind. There’s often extreme current, and sometimes both are in different directions. You can have waves over the bow with wind, and the fly has to end up in a six-inch diameter circle. It’s a game of inches.”

Use the Right Gear

Use gear that’s heavy enough. You don’t want to be under-gunned. A rod that’s too light will result in prolonged battles. A 10 weight is adequate. An 11 or 12 weight is better. For conventional gear, try medium heavy to heavy rods.

The Axiom II is a good choice for those who prefer fly. Our GIS Inshore or Seahunter Series works well for conventional enthusiasts.

Picking the Right Fly/Lure

The Cockroach may be the most famous and productive tarpon fly. I personally prefer the tarpon toad in black and purple. It’s easy to tie and it works. Rabbit strips are one my tying favorite materials simply because of the movement generated. And movement, as TFO advisor Blane Chocklett explains, is key to enticing strikes. I had never really thought about this concept before, but it makes perfect sense. Fish are predators. Feed them what they want.

When it comes to movement, conventional lures are hard to beat. Obvious choices are Bombers and DOAs and Yo-Zuri minnows.

“In sight-fishing scenarios we often use unweighted bass worms or flukes,” Fordyce said. “These baits will almost suspend allowing a lot of movement with a short, twitchy retrieve that can still be pretty slow without having to reel much. This can entice traveling fish to bite that aren’t in a feeding mode much the same way as a fly retrieve.”

Entire blog posts have been devoted to tarpon lures and flies. If you want more info, talk with your guide. Local knowledge is always best.

Seeing the Fish

There’s also a mental challenge involved with tarpon fishing. Count on long periods of time between schools of fish. The ability to concentrate through the doldrums is essential and usually acquired with experience.

“There can be times when you’re getting a shot every thirty seconds, and then there could be hours in between shots,” Fordyce said. “It could be four, five hours of just nothing. That’s when you really have to dig deep and focus hard. That’s when the shots are few and far between and you only get so many.”

Teamwork

You and your guide are a team. Ideally, he puts you on fish. The client’s job is to make an accurate cast, hook the fish and then land it. Rarely is it that easy. Mistakes happen and tempers can flare. The key, as in any relationship, is communication, particularly when it comes to the client’s skill level and expectations, so the chaos can be managed.

“There’s a lot of moving parts,” Fordyce said. “It’s a team sport. Your guide is trying to set you up for the most productive shot. There’s a lot going on.”

 

Headed out to pursue the Silver King? Let us know how you do on one of our social media channels. Want to add more tips or suggestions, feel free to speak up.

It’s Time for ICAST 2018

It’s the second week of July. ICAST 2018 is here, and Temple Fork Outfitters will be among the vendors at the world’s largest sportfishing tradeshow.

TFO has participated in ICAST since the 1990s, an annual event the company looks forward to every summer.

“ICAST is an opportunity for TFO to identify industry trends, to evaluate response to our new offerings and to socialize with our many dealer and industry friends,” TFO Chairman Rick Pope said. “We expect to leave the show with clearer expectations for TFO business through 2019. This is the 24th year that TFO has participated in ICAST, and each year we’ve welcomed the opportunity to showcase our products and meet with our distributors and customers.”

The four-day, Orlando, Fla. affair allows companies in the fishing industry to personalize their products while meeting a wide-range of anglers, from those who design the gear to those who run the companies. All share the same passion for the outdoors.

“While it’s true that ICAST is the perfect annual opportunity to spend time with old friends and business partners, as well as to cement new relationships, for me there’s nothing better than meeting folks attending for the first time,” TFO CEO Frank-Paul King said. “The combination of joy and bewilderment they feel is the perfect chance to talk about the size and breadth of the fishing industry and the role we all play in ensuring great fisheries for generations to come.”

Feel free to stop by the TFO booth. You can try out rods and talk to members of our advisory staff.

Our hottest new product is the Axiom II Switch rod, which recently was recognized as the best new product in the fly rod category at the EFTTEX (European Fishing Tackle Trade Exhibition) show earlier this summer in Amsterdam. The AII casts like a dream. Try it for yourself at the ICAST casting pond!

Other new TFO products worth a look ae the Pro II two-handed series, the Finesse Trout Glass fly rods, the Bluewater SG fly rods, the Seahunter spinning/casting series and the TFO Inshore spinning/casting series. TFO advisors Wanda Taylor, Ed Jaworowski, Jake Jordan and Rob Fordyce helped design a few of these products. Other TFO advisory staff expected to stop by ICAST are Flip Pallot, Bob Clouser, Larry Dahlberg, Nick Curcione, Rod Harrison, Gary Loomis, Cliff Pace, Gary Dubiel and Blane Chocklett.

All are scheduled to be at the TFO booth and available to provide additional information and insight on TFO products.

TFO Helps Set the Pace at Texas Fest

A few days after his finishing up the Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest, TFO advisor Cliff Pace took inventory of his performance.

Third place isn’t too bad. Not at all.

“Any time you give yourself an opportunity to win on our level, (it’s good),” Pace said. “I did that. I just came up a little short in total weight. All in all, it was a good week to finish third and get the big fish of the weekend. That was a neat deal. Given that, it’s hard to complain, but yes, you do always want to win. Third is better than fourth.”

It was Pace’s first top-three Bassmaster finish since 2013.  He will head to his next tournament with an extra $30,000 and a new Toyota Tundra after landing the event’s biggest bass during the May 17-20 affair.

“Momentum creates confidence, and confidence is good in anything from a competitive aspect,” Pace said.

Pace totaled 61 pounds, 12 ounces, trailing only Drew Benton (67 pounds, 15 ounces) and Jacob Wheeler (64 pounds, 8 ounces).

The key to his success? Versatility.

“I fished smarter,” Pace said. “I have multiple different patterns that will work, depending on the weather scenarios. You see a lot of guys who will have a really good day and then a really bad day. I had enough different things going on where I could be consistent each day. A lot of guys will catch fifteen pounds one day, then eight the next. I was able to stay in the teens every day. Over four days, you add up the numbers and it etches you up the list. A lot of guys they had the deep pattern going, then we had the overcast skies, and they weren’t as successful. I had enough things going on with the event to make it work with the changing conditions.”

Pace’s biggest bass weighed 10 pounds, 5 ounces. He caught it using a TFO Pacemaker 747 with a Carolina rig and a Drop Shad in about 25 feet of water. He boated it within the first 10 minutes of fishing on the first morning.

“What it does is it gives you confidence in what you’re doing,” Pace said. “It makes you believe what you’re doing is the right thing, so I could settle down and fish and fish more effectively and efficiently. That’s what you want to do — find the right thing. But if you settle on the wrong thing, there’s danger in that. Catching a big one like that gives you faith in the area of the lake that you’re fishing.”

Lake Travis, located near Austin, is known for its water clarity and its stout population of bucket-mouth bruisers.

“That lake has a lot of big fish in it,” Pace said. “There were four fish over eight pounds in the tournament.”

Next up for Pace is the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Elite in Orange, Texas on June 7-10, as he tries maintain momentum for the Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year honors. He currently stands in second behind Brent Chapman

“To win that would be a very big deal,” Pace said. “It’s something I’ve worked for my whole career. I’ve gotten close a couple times. I’ve never been able to pull off winning it. It’s a little too early in the year to be thinking about it. I’ve gotten off to a very good start. It definitely feels good to be in position the rest of the year.”

Check out the TFO blog for more info as we follow Cliff on the Bassmaster circuit.

TFO Announces Partnership with Outtech, Inc.

Temple Fork Outfitters is pleased to announce that it has signed Outtech, Inc. as its national sales agency for conventional fishing products. Effective June 1st, Outtech will begin promoting and representing TFO’s conventional line of fishing rods across all sales channels. This new partnership is a strategic initiative designed to significantly expand the sale and brand awareness of TFO’s conventional product line.

“The breadth and depth of the Outtech team is unsurpassed in the outdoor space. They bring a proven sales leadership advantage to TFO that made them the logical choice as we work toward achieving our business goals. As we’ve grown beyond our roots in the fly fishing industry, it has become imperative to find a sales team on the conventional side of the business that is capable of executing across our mix of great independent deals, distributors, and national box stores. We’re committed to conducting business with honesty and integrity, and always with the success of TFO dealers first and foremost in our minds; Outtech’s guiding principles are the same and we’re confident that this new partnership will demonstrate these shared core values,” said Frank-Paul King, President of Temple Fork Outfitters.

“Outtech is proud to announce its alliance with Temple Fork Outfitters and the opportunity to support its growth in the conventional fishing segment of the industry. Outtech is focused on expanding its representation of quality fishing brands and TFO is the perfect partner with whom to make a significant impact; their incredible rods and brand make TFO an outstanding fit for the Outtech team,” said Jay Scholes, President of Outtech.

About Outtech, Inc.: Established in 1989, Outtech, Inc. is one of the largest sales and marketing organizations in the outdoor industry. With more than 25 years of experience, Outtech is dedicated to providing sales representation to some of the leading brands in the outdoors and is built on a team of over 80 industry specialists spread across multiple divisions focused on all sales channels. For more information, please visit: www.outtech-online.com

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO): TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, lakes and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork. For more information, please visit: www.tforods.com

Temple Fork Outfitters
Dallas, TX 75247

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters
instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters
twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.

Tips for Spawning Bass: Part I

Depending on where you live, winter is almost over. The spring thaw has started, which means it’s time for spawning bass. Temple Fork Outfitters ambassador Joey Nania shared a handful of tips with TFO blog editor Mike Hodge on how to fish the spawn, so you’ll be prepared to catch a big bucketmouth.

Spring Time is Prime Time

“Spawning bass is all about spring. And there’s a couple key factors that have to mix properly to get the fish where they will spawn. One of the keys is water temperature. It depends on where you live. For instance in Florida the fish can be finicky and they come up when the the water’s warmer. Some bass will spawn when the water is in the 58-degree range. The magic number is 60 degrees. The bass are going to spawn on either a full or new moon when the water temperature reaches the 60, 70-degree range, anywhere in that range. That’s when it all starts. They will be in pre spawn and staging before that. When the water warms up and you get the moon phase, that’s when they really go. They start fanning and doing their business.”

Shallow Water and Structure

“There’s a big difference between largemouth spawn and where smallmouth and spotted bass spawn. Largemouth spawn in shallow pockets and in shallow flats. They liked to be protected and tucked up against some structure like a dock or laydown tree or a hole in the grass bed in four feet or less. So you want to be shallow in a flat area like a pocket or a super shallow creek flat near structure. Stumps are good. Next to a dock, something that they can get next to — for protection.

Don’t Forget About the Other Species

“Spotted bass and smallmouth spawn similarly. They’re going to spawn on flats and points and rocky, gravel structures, where largemouth are more on pockets. Flats, humps, any shallow spot four feet or less, that’s where spots and smallmouth will spawn — and more in open water. It’s not going to be protected as much. It could be on a flat in the middle of a creek.”

Strategy and Tools of the Trade

“With the smallmouth and the spots, a lot of times you can’t see them. They spawn on the more open-water structures. My favorite (setup) for catching those species when you’re blindcasting, where you think they’re spawning and you’re picking off areas, I like to use a TFO Pacemaker, 6-10 medium with 20-pound braid to a 10-pound fluorocarbon leader. A Carolina Rig with a 3-foot leader is a little trick also for blindcasting on the flats on the open-water beds. I like to fish a lizard or a Fluke on the back of it.”

Patience is Virtue

“It’s all about presenting it slow. One of the most important things is when you see a piece of structure that looks right, when you throw that bait, you want to wait, three to five seconds before you ever move it. After that, give the bait little small movements until you’re out of the strike zone. Fishing it slow is really important. Sometimes if one is bedding there, it might take multiple casts, even if you can’t see them.”

Sight Fishing Strategy

“You have to find the fish first and having a good pair of polarized glasses is very important for that. Once you’ve found them, you want to use little craw baits, Texas-rigged soft-plastic crawdad baits. Those tend to make them mad. The Shaky Head also works good for that.”

Minimizing Expectations and Playing the Game

“This is important. Every bass you find on the bed is different. One of the biggest keys is to be able to see the fish and how it’s moving, what it’s doing and to tell if the fish is catchable or not. Some fish are easy to catch and some bed fish are very difficult to catch. If you keep hunting for those easy-to-catch ones, you can normally find enough to have a productive day and catch some good, quality fish. You’re looking for ones that are easy to catch. If it’s a giant, I’ve worked fish up to an hour before I got them to bite. If it’s a big fish and if you’ve got an hour to spend, that’s not a bad idea. The key is if the fish leaves and doesn’t come back for maybe three to five minutes, it doesn’t care that you’re there. If it leaves and comes (right) back, then you know have a catchable fish. Pay attention to the signs. If they start looking up at the bait, and once they start turning up, all it takes is a little pop. Understanding the mood of the fish is important. It can be frustrating at times.”

 

Any more tips on spawning bass? Feel free to comment. Next week, we’ll look at how to catch spawning bass on fly.

A Note from the Kreh Family

Dear friends,

I am sorry to relay sad information to all of you.

Bernard Victor Kreh “Lefty” passed away today  in the presence of his family. He passed without pain. He told us multiple times during the worsening of his illness how lucky he was to have so many friends. During these last few weeks he was so sick and without energy that he was unable to respond to any emails and the many phone messages left for him. I can say this was a-great comfort to him.

There will be a celebration of his life in the upcoming weeks. We will update you when plans are made. 

Lefty would want us to celebrate life and not mourn him.

Tight Lines, best wishes,

The Kreh Family

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to:
Greater Baltimore Medical Center / Gilchrist hospice in honor of Lefty Kreh

Mail to: GBMC Philanthropy, 6701 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21204
or contribute online at: https://www.gbmc.org/donate (Under “Designation” choose “Other.” Then in the next field, type: “Lefty Kreh Memorial”)
or call: 443-849-3303.  

TFO Proudly Introduces the Traveler Rod Series

Traveling with fishing rods has always been a challenge for anglers and finding a quality multi-piece conventional rod with the effortless action of your favorite one-piece rod has been impossible. TFO solves the globe-trotting angler’s dilemma with the Traveler Series. This series of seven-foot, 3-piece spinning and casting rods mirror the look and feel of the legendary Tactical family of fishing rods. 20 years of engineering some of the lightest high-performance, multi-piece fly rods on the market was the perfect preparation for developing a conventional line of rods to meet the needs of any angler. And none other than Larry Dahlberg, one the greatest world-traveling anglers of all time, made sure we designed nothing less than the best.

The Traveler Series are crafted through a combination of IM carbon fiber and a proprietary light weight scrim. By use of a precision CNC sanding process, the re-enforced ferrules are fitted to 1/10,000 of an inch, creating a snug and seamless fit. The result is an incredibly light and sensitive, fast-action high-performance fishing tool. Handsomely finished, the non-glare sky blue blanks are fitted with premium cork grips, TFO’s exclusive skeletal reel seats and topped with Fuji’s new Fazlite Corrosion Control K-Frame guides, making them safe for either fresh or saltwater environments.

Designed for the adventurer in all of us, the Traveler Series remains true to TFO’s commitment of matching price to performance. Traveler rods include rod socks and are packaged in an airline overhead friendly, 32” hard nylon lined rod tube and retails for $199.95

https://www.tforods.com/traveler-rods/

About Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO):

TFO assembled the world’s most accomplished, crafty anglers to design a complete line of fishing rods priced to bring more anglers into the sport. Because we believe that anyone who has the fishing bug as bad as we do deserves the highest performance equipment available to take their game to the next level. And in our experience, when we get people connecting with fish, they connect with nature. And they join us in our mission of keeping our rivers, streams, and oceans in good shape for the next generation. There’s a new breed of anglers out there. They’re smart. They’re passionate. They’re socially conscious. And they’re fishing Temple Fork.

Temple Fork Outfitters
Dallas, TX 75247

facebook.com/templeforkoutfitters
instagram.com/templeforkoutfitters
twitter.com/tforods

Download a PDF version of this press release here.